bumboat


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bumboat

[′bəm‚bōt]
(naval architecture)
A small boat on which a hoist has been installed for operating dredge lines and handling anchors.
References in periodicals archive ?
The bumboats drew alongside with their tarbouched hucksters, lemonade, confectionary and oranges piled in their stern.
With painted eyes to see the way, a gasping one-lung diesel engine, and wooden plank seats, the broad-beamed bumboat is the workhorse of Singapore's harbor.
A 45-minute taxi ride will take you from a five-star hotel to the small ferry station at Changi where, for just over EUR1.15, you can hop on board a rickety, wooden bumboat.
A 45-minute taxi ride will take you from a five-star hotel to the small ferry station at Changi where, for just over pounds 1, you can hop on board a rickety, wooden bumboat.
CHECK OUT DOWNTOWN SINGAPORE ON A BUMBOATS (small water taxis) are a great way to see the city and its stunning architecture.
CHECK OUT DOWNTOWN SINGAPORE ON A BUMBOATS (small water taxis) are a great way to see the city and NEED TO KNOW | NORWEGIAN (norwegian.com/uk or 0330 828 0854) flies the world's longest low-cost route to Singapore from London Gatwick four times a week in the brand new Boeing 787 Dreamliner.
We were told, for instance, that the bumboats are often painted with eyes and faces so that they can supposedly 'see' the dangers ahead, and that they were vital to the commercial activity on the Singapore River for more than 150 years.
While the Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) can trace its roots back to the 1800s when Sailors had to depend on "bumboats" that moored alongside their ships to buy personal items, it wasn't until April 1, 1946, that Navy leadership officially created a command to handle the necessary retail business within the Navy.
The current Navy leadership, and its vast attending squadron of contractor bumboats, will respond by furiously puffing the Dragon, warning that the fleet described here would not be adequate for war with China.
But the officers, and also the men, bought stocks of local produce whenever they touched land, in the markets or from the bumboats that flocked round the ships as soon as they dropped anchor.
Just 15 years ago, this was a bustling harbor jammed with brightly painted bumboats. Today the boats are gone and the old shophouses fronting the quay are slated for restoration similar to Tanjong Pagar's.