bummer


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bummer

[′bəm·ər]
(forestry)
A low truck with two wheels for carrying logs, or a tracked cart for dragging them.
(mining engineering)
The person who runs conveyors in a quarry or mine.
References in periodicals archive ?
The free bummer lamb taught me that it isn't worth it to bottle feed a lamb if I would have to buy the lamb and buy milk replacer.
NEW YORK -- Sweltering subways, weekend traffic jams, and bulked-up beach bulliesOsometimes summer can seem more like a bummer than its easy-living reputation implies.
uk DAVID WEIR admits the summer will be a bummer if Rangers fail to cap their campaign with a Scottish Cup victory.
There's a perfect expression in English for this feeling of let-down and disappointment, mixed in with some mild annoyance: bummer.
A bummer to miss a start and get off schedule a little.
The eighteen small works in Bill Davenport's latest show ranged from boyish sight gags like Bummer, 1999, an enameled bean can and golf ball arranged to suggest a missed putt, to the inscrutable fluff of Pair of Lint Sculptures, 1998, in which a couple of fat, ill-formed pancakes made from the detritus of a clothes dryer are displayed with absurd care on a neat little white shelf.
WALKER "IT "IT was a bummer not was a bummer not to win.
BOY BUMMER After crushing on the boy in your bio class for months, you work up the nerve to ask him to the spring dance.
Also making this slow-moving, over-obvious movie easy to take is the way Stallone has finally cut through all the phony triumphalism (first film), hyped-up self-doubt/corruption (``Rocky II'' and ``III''), geopolitical metaphors (``IV,'' which was so Cold War kitschy it still remains my favorite of the series) and melodramatic tragedy (``V,'' which was such a bummer it K.