bummer


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bummer

[′bəm·ər]
(forestry)
A low truck with two wheels for carrying logs, or a tracked cart for dragging them.
(mining engineering)
The person who runs conveyors in a quarry or mine.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
With BUMMER businesses, your attention is the product.
Bummers. There's no ingredients or nutritional info.
Linda and I are cuddling in the front seat of Dad's '68 Volkswagen Beetle parked overlooking Bummer's Flats.
DOES RESEARCH on happiness prove markets are a bummer? Political scientist Benjamin Radcliff of Notre Dame University, summing up his recent studies in Social Forces and the American Political Science Review, says survey research shows that "the more we supplement the cold efficiency of the free market system with interventions that reduce poverty, insecurity and inequality, the more we improve the quality of life."
Season 3 was a bummer. [The character of] Dana Fairbanks [was] the one woman on The L Word who made us all stand up and take notice.
Klein calls the malaise memo an "intellectual tour de force" and a "total bummer." With Shrum, who emerged as chief consultant on the campaign of John Kerry in 2004, Klein is even tougher.
English-born Baroness let slip: 'The start of the year was a bit of a bummer really.' Oops.
A boom that won't work on your MLRS is a real bummer. No boom means no missile loading.
"Get the number 15 tram from Huyton," he said, "we are presenting your prize tomorrow morning in the Fourth Grace." What a bummer
Shore thing: Deacon thinks he can make it into ocean Beach bummer: But Reese makes a grab for him High and dry: The tot gets a lift