buoy


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Wikipedia.
Related to buoy: buoy up

buoy

(boi, bo͞o`ē), float anchored in navigable waters to mark channels and indicate dangers to navigation (isolated rocks, mine fields, cables, and the like). The shape, color, number, and marking of the buoy are all significant, but unfortunately there are two competing systems of color coding which have been adopted in different parts of the world. The International Association of Lighthouse Authorities (IALA) adopted a system in 1977 which uses red for the left–hand side of a channel returning from the sea and green for the right side. Because the American rule has always been "red to the right returning," the IALA accepted a second system in 1983 which would keep the traditional color–coding for U.S. waters. Both systems use yellow to indicate special zones, such as fishing areas, anchorages, dredging operations, etc. Although the spar buoys (upright posts) used in northern latitudes are usually wooden, large buoys are generally made of steel or iron. Nun buoys have conical tops; can buoys have flat tops. Buoys may be fitted with bells or whistles (usually operated by motion of the waves), and battery-powered light buoys are commonly used; radio buoys came into use in 1939. There are also mooring buoys, used for the anchoring of ships.

buoy

[bȯi]
(engineering)
An anchored or moored floating object, other than a lightship, intended as an aid to navigation, to attach or suspend measuring instruments, or to mark the position of something beneath the water.

buoy

a distinctively shaped and coloured float, anchored to the bottom, for designating moorings, navigable channels, or obstructions in a body of water
References in periodicals archive ?
Authorities learnt about the missing buoys after they failed to transmit data every 15 minutes as they were meant to do.
The front buoy works in principle of the heave-type oscillating buoy WEC and the kinetic energy in heave mode of the buoy can be converted into the useful energy by using a PTO system.
"Next year, we plan to restore another buoy at 'Halet Umm al Khayfan', known as 'Burj Al Asiri'.
Successful trial results of the next generation of multi-purpose buoys for the renewable energy industry that use Lidar - the light-based version of radar - have led to orders from operators in the wind energy sector.
where m is the heavy buoy's weight and [[??].sub.z] is the heavy buoy's acceleration.
As we reached our first launch point, I looked down at the ACIP and saw an AWAY light on the SONO LAUNCH pushbutton, heard the good sound of air flow, then glanced in the side-view mirror as the buoy left the launcher.
in McLean, Va., says each system consists of three subsystems: a surface communications buoy, a buoy mooring, and a bottom pressure recorder.
Police arrested a 23-year-old man Cramlington man when he was found in possession of the ring buoy in Cross Street in Gateshead on Friday.
Our condolences go out to Richard Guest and his yard and Bamboozelem - the owners of Dan Buoy, who were such big supporters of Pontefract.
Ocean Power already has a permit for one buoy; it's now seeking nine more.
NORDIC BUSINESS REPORT-September 2, 2011--AF Gruppen seals NOK49m deal to recycle loading buoy of Statoil(C)2011 M2 COMMUNICATIONS http://www.m2.com
The buoy will also help scientists determine how seawater pH changes throughout the seasons.