buoy

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buoy

(boi, bo͞o`ē), float anchored in navigable waters to mark channels and indicate dangers to navigation (isolated rocks, mine fields, cables, and the like). The shape, color, number, and marking of the buoy are all significant, but unfortunately there are two competing systems of color coding which have been adopted in different parts of the world. The International Association of Lighthouse Authorities (IALA) adopted a system in 1977 which uses red for the left–hand side of a channel returning from the sea and green for the right side. Because the American rule has always been "red to the right returning," the IALA accepted a second system in 1983 which would keep the traditional color–coding for U.S. waters. Both systems use yellow to indicate special zones, such as fishing areas, anchorages, dredging operations, etc. Although the spar buoys (upright posts) used in northern latitudes are usually wooden, large buoys are generally made of steel or iron. Nun buoys have conical tops; can buoys have flat tops. Buoys may be fitted with bells or whistles (usually operated by motion of the waves), and battery-powered light buoys are commonly used; radio buoys came into use in 1939. There are also mooring buoys, used for the anchoring of ships.

buoy

[bȯi]
(engineering)
An anchored or moored floating object, other than a lightship, intended as an aid to navigation, to attach or suspend measuring instruments, or to mark the position of something beneath the water.

buoy

a distinctively shaped and coloured float, anchored to the bottom, for designating moorings, navigable channels, or obstructions in a body of water
References in classic literature ?
That excited sense of his own conduct which had kept him up for the last ten days buoyed him no more.
It buoyed him as he journeyed home beneath fading heavens.
It was a weary tramp in all ways, and if hope had not buoyed me up, I must have cast myself down and given up.
He had buoyed himself up all day with an indistinct idea that she would certainly say 'Don't go,' or 'Don't leave us,' or 'Why do you go?
The hope of eventually clearing himself with them, too, and explaining how he had been forced away, had buoyed him up, and sustained him, under many of his recent trials; and now, the idea that they should have gone so far, and carried with them the belief that the was an impostor and a robber--a belief which might remain uncontradicted to his dying day--was almost more than he could bear.
Serjeant Buzfuz began by saying, that never, in the whole course of his professional experience--never, from the very first moment of his applying himself to the study and practice of the law--had he approached a case with feelings of such deep emotion, or with such a heavy sense of the responsibility imposed upon him--a responsibility, he would say, which he could never have supported, were he not buoyed up and sustained by a conviction so strong, that it amounted to positive certainty that the cause of truth and justice, or, in other words, the cause of his much-injured and most oppressed client, must prevail with the high-minded and intelligent dozen of men whom he now saw in that box before him.