burden

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burden

1
Nautical
a. the cargo capacity of a ship
b. the weight of a ship's cargo

burden

2
1. a line of words recurring at the end of each verse of a ballad or similar song; chorus or refrain
2. another word for bourdon
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

burden

[′bərd·ən]
(electricity)
The amount of power drawn from the circuit connecting the secondary terminals of an instrument transformer, usually expressed in volt-amperes.
(engineering)
The distance from a drill hole to the more or less vertical surface of rock that has already been exposed by blasting or excavating.
The volume of the rock to be removed by blasting in a drill hole.
(geology)
All types of rock or earthy materials overlying bedrock.
(metallurgy)
The material which is melted in a direct arc furnace.
In an iron blast furnace, the ratio of iron and flux to coke and other fuels in the charge.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

burden

1. Earthy material, rock, etc., which overlays bedrock.
2. In blasting, the distance between the blasting charge and the free face of the material to be blasted.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The report concludes that rental affordability is improving, as 2016 marks the fifth consecutive year in which renter incomes increased faster than rents, reducing the share of cost burdened renters.
(69) He moved to dismiss the charges, claiming that the Eagle Act's prohibitions on the possession and sale of eagles substantially burdened his exercise of religion in violation of RFRA.
The purpose can only be a punitive one, to create burdens that are so onerous on this industry that lots of people are driven out of business." Smaller producers and distributors, he points out, will be especially burdened. Individuals who stream webcam images of themselves over the Internet, for example, may find it prohibitively expensive to preserve copies of all the content they transmit.