burnt lime


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burnt lime

[¦bərnt ′līm]
(inorganic chemistry)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

lime

A white or grayish-white caustic substance, calcium oxide, usually obtained by heating limestone or marble at a high temperature; used chiefly in plasters, mortars, and cements. In the past, in many areas along the seacoast where limestone was scarce, seashells were heated to obtain lime. See also hydrated lime, hydraulic lime, mortar, shell lime, slaked lime.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Reproducibly good results are possible even with low-grade burnt lime, which is frequently used as a by-product in steel works.
Several hundred tower mills have already been installed, while over 150 high pressure roller mills are at work pregrinding or fine-grinding cement clinker, limestone, burnt lime and other brittle materials, with energy savings compared to ball mills of 30% to 50%.
The hole can be patched with a shovel or ram type mix using the following procedure: Fill the hole with water, follow with patch material and cover the area with burnt lime. This type of patch will generally outlast surrounding bottom areas.
200 YEARS AGO: Recipe for making manure from green vegetable matter decomposed by quick or fresh burnt lime. A layer of vegetable matter a foot thick and then a very thin layer of lime.