burnup


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burnup

[′bər‚nəp]
(nucleonics)
A measure of nuclear-reactor fuel consumption, expressed either as the percentage of fuel atoms that have undergone fission or as the amount of energy produced per unit weight of fuel.
References in periodicals archive ?
The automated system for control of reactor fuel properties considering fuel cladding damage parameter, fuel burnup and axial offset has been proposed.
While this ratio varies with burnup, the values were selected such that the peak power occurs on the limiting elements and hence it is conservative for the MCST and MFCLT calculations.
Cuthbert Burnup built railway wagons as early as 1829 and that may be the link for the appearance in the book of John Blackmore, who was appointed as chief engineer in 1833 for the Newcastle-Carlisle railway.
Fuel Costs: This is the total annual cost associated with the "burnup" of nuclear fuel resulting from the operation of the unit.
Even after 10years in the cooling ponds, high burnup fuel rods are problematic.
Duff's career in the construction industry began in July 1971 when, after completing a tour of duty in the armed forces, he began working for LP&H, which was later bought out by Burnup & Sims Incorporated.
This March it's slated for a computer-controlled burnup over the Pacific Ocean, 3,000 kilometers (1,850 miles) east of Australia.
The approach employed by SMLOD is called the "Low-Order-Method." This procedure separates the firing device from the explosive charge, leading to a burnup or a deflagration, instead of detonating the charge.
With an enrichment level of 1.2%, fuel burnup (burnup = energy produced by the fuel per unit weight) is increased by almost a factor of 3, and uranium consumption drops by about 25% compared to natural uranium fuel.
Y se convirtio en la columna vertebral de Mas Tec Inc, el conglomerado empresarial de Mas Canosa, que se formo con la incorporacion de Burnup & Sima Inc, de Palm Beach y otras companias de la familia Mas, particularmente las dedicadas a los bienes raices.
Burnup & Sims,(113) a 1964 Supreme Court decision that fits somewhat awkwardly with the Court's section 8(a)(3) decisions,(114) also usefully demonstrates this point.