burst transmission


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burst transmission

[′bərst tranz′mish·ən]
(communications)
A radio transmission in which messages stored for a given time are sent at from 10 to more than 100 times the normal rate, recorded when received, and then slowed down to the normal rate for the user.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Mathematical analysis of burst transmission scheme for IEEE 802.3az Energy Efficient Ethernet.
In next element, burst transmission algorithm is planned to decrease the energy utilization of mobile devices.
Woodward, "Analysis and Comparison of Burst Transmission Schemes in Unsaturated 802.11e WLANs," in Global Telecommunications Conference (Globecom), Washington, DC, USA, 2007, pp.
As was mentioned FDL is expensive and the buffer length is limited, so wavelength conversion and burst segmentation could assure higher service quality for customer but these technologies aren't economical and fully developed, and there is a demand in sophisticated control for burst transmission.
The reason that the overall throughput decreases after 1024 bytes packet size proves the tradeoff between the burst transmission and the packet error rate.
The resulting burst process is characterized as a bulk burst transmission that is slotted in time.
Our goal is to understand how ANT transmits messages and uses the bandwidth and to verify if ANT offers the same theoretical baud rate with burst transmission rate.
The arrival process of bursts modeled by a two-state Markov processes, called IDLE-ON, which accurately captures the burst transmission at the edge nodes of the OBS network [7].
Additionally, the CR user stops transmitting when primary burst transmission suddenly appear in the channel.
An identity borrowed from a dead Canadian, forged passports, messages sent by shortwave burst transmission or in invisible ink.
The packets are electronically aggregated at the network edge into bursts, according to their destination and class of service (CoS), but with timescale of milliseconds, which is a typical forwarding time of IP routers, making the reservation of resources along the path prior to burst transmission feasible.