sexton

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Related to burying beetle: sexton beetle

sexton

1. a person employed to act as caretaker of a church and its contents and graveyard, and often also as bell-ringer, gravedigger, etc.
2. another name for the burying beetle
References in periodicals archive ?
Carcass selection in a high altitude population of the burying beetle, Nicrophorus investigator (Silphidae).
K9 University is now expanding the research efforts to develop dogs to alert on the actual American Burying Beetle, as this will allow for year-round development and protection of the species," said Soriano.
Standardized capture rates of the endangered American burying beetle, Nicrophorus americanus Olivier (Coleoptera: Silphidae) using different trap protocols.
Biologists often refer to the American burying beetle by the nickname ABB.
In the summer of 2008, biologists released 228 pairs of captive-bred American burying beetles (Nicrophorus americanus) on the Wayne National Forest in southeast Ohio.
American burying beetle (Nicrophorus americanus) Reintroduction of this carrion beetle continues on Nantucket Island, off the coast of Massachusetts.
American Burying Beetle (Nicrophorus americanus) The largest American burying beetle reintroduction effort in the 12-year history of the species' recovery program took place recently on Nantucket Island off the Massachusetts coast.
The AMERICAN BURYING BEETLE (Nicrophorus americanus) is 1-inch long, shiny black with orange spots, and is valuable in the recycling of decaying matter, which it feeds upon.
In the decade since the American burying beetle (Nicrophorus americanus) was added to the endangered species list, an impressive number and variety of cooperators have stepped forward to participate in the recovery of this unusual species.
org/species/burying-beetle) Burying beetles breed on fresh mouse carcasses, which are very scarce.
Well-known scavengers of dead animal materials include buzzards, vultures and crows, rodents and raccoons, burying beetles and yellow-jacket wasps.
Washington, June 19 ( ANI ): Researchers at the University of Exeter have revealed that that older male burying beetles make better fathers than their younger counterparts.