hatchet

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hatchet:

see tomahawktomahawk
[from an Algonquian dialect of Virginia], hatchet generally used by Native North Americans as a hand weapon and as a missile. The earliest tomahawks were made of stone, with one edge or two edges sharpened (sometimes the stone was globe shaped).
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hatchet

[′hach·ət]
(design engineering)
A small ax with a short handle and a hammerhead in addition to the cutting edge.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

hatchet

hatchet
A combination chopping and driving tool which has a wooden handle and a steel head, with a hammer face and a blade which is notched for pulling nails.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

hatchet

a short axe used for chopping wood, etc.
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Formerly separated, Catholics and Protestants are busy burying the hatchet and avoiding old doctrinal differences in the pursuit of a common political vision: one nation of clean cut, conformist subjects ruled by an omniscient, punitive male deity.
Snow said "I'm delighted to be burying the hatchet with my university.
THERE'S no sign of Kerry Katona and soon to be ex-hubby, Brian McFadden, burying the hatchet. Ever.