bushel

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bushel:

see English units of measurementEnglish units of measurement,
principal system of weights and measures used in a few nations, the only major industrial one being the United States. It actually consists of two related systems—the U.S.
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bushel

[′bu̇sh·əl]
(mechanics)
Abbreviated bu.
A unit of volume (dry measure) used in the United States, equal to 2150.42 cubic inches or approximately 35.239 liters.
A unit of volume (liquid and dry measure) used in Britain, equal to 2219.36 cubic inches or 8 imperial gallons (approximately 36.369 liters).

bushel

1. a Brit unit of dry or liquid measure equal to 8 Imperial gallons. 1 Imperial bushel is equivalent to 0.036 37 cubic metres
2. a US unit of dry measure equal to 64 US pints. 1 US bushel is equivalent to 0.035 24 cubic metres
References in periodicals archive ?
Iowa and Illinois corn yield projections were increased by three bushels per acre and Indiana projections up by eight bushels per acre.
The new elevator had a capacity of 460,000 bushels, the largest by far of any country elevator in Manitoba.
369 bushels per acre, followed by Brad French in O'Kean (Randolph County) with 85.
When full production capacity is reached, the plant will consume 150,000 bushels of corn a day and turn out five products, including dextrose, ethanol and SweetBran feed for cattle," Al Viaene, manager of Cargill's Fort Dodge plant, said in a statement.
26 billion bushels of soybeans this year, compared with the 3.
USDA's survey of farmers and warehouses showed 988 million bushels of corn on hand - 11 per cent less than expected - on September1.
Based on these data, total per acre yields of 300 to 400 bushels look possible.
31 billion bushels of corn currently available and 87.
For example, the Brookhurst Farm can produce either 20,000 bushels of AA yellow corn or 22,000 bushels of GM yellow corn.
During the Middle Ages it seems we measured grain in bushels and a bushel, when full of wheat, was reckoned to weigh 64 tower pounds or 56 avoirdupois pounds.
018 billion bushels - a one-month supply - by the time the 2009 crop is ready for harvest, the Agriculture Department said.
The wagon is called a 72-bushel wagon because every inch of the wagon box held two bushels of grain.