butcherbird


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Related to butcherbird: Cracticus

butcherbird

1. a shrike, esp one of the genus Lanius
2. any of several Australian magpies of the genus Cracticus that impale their prey on thorns
References in periodicals archive ?
E25 has received results for an aircore drilling program completed in the June quarter targeting channel manganese within a well-defined paleochannel system within the exploration tenure footprint at Butcherbird.
Beginning with La Guma's artistic primer, A Walk in the Night (1962) to his last fictive work, Time of the Butcherbird (1979) to his journalistic writing, essays and interviews, his commitment to change the oppressive apartheid landscape is demonstrated in his anti-apartheid struggle for equitable order in apartheid South Africa that has culminated in the dividends of post-apartheid South Africa.
Male splendid fairy-wrens, a sexually promiscuous small bird native to Australia, are known to sing a special song each time they hear the call of one of their predators, the butcherbirds.
Which British bird is also called the butcherbird because of its habit of hanging dead insects on bushes?
* 'I'd like to know the adaptations of the pied butcherbird ...
A further instance of this syntactic foreshadowing is found at the beginning of Time of the Butcherbird. "When the government trucks had gone, the dust they had left behind hung over the plain and smudged the blistering afternoon sun so that it appeared as a daub of white-hot metal through the moving haze" (La Guma 1979, 11).
From this beginning -- in violence which is without political purpose -- the novels move from a plea for solidarity (And a Threefold Cord, 1964), to a delineation of the experience of political imprisonment as a metaphor for apartheid itself (The Stone Country, 1967), to an account of the day-to-day struggle of a revolutionary agent on the run (In the Fog of the Season's End, 1972), and finally to Time of the Butcherbird (1979), in which an African protagonist avenges the murder of his brother by a white racist parliamentary candidate and then embarks on a career as an armed revolutionary.
He's more interested in the likes of the grey butcherbird, all 75 grams of it, which mobs a species called the powerful owl.
Nicknamed "butcherbird" for its habit of impaling on thorns and barbed-wire fences the grasshoppers and mice it catches, this bird once was common throughout North America, from the southern Canadian provinces down through Mexico.
His novel Time of the Butcherbird appeared in 1979.
His published works include A Walk in the Night (1962), And a Threefold Cord (1964), The Stone Country (1967; reprinted 1978), In the Fog of the Season's End (1972), and Time of the Butcherbird (1979).