bypass

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bypass

1. a main road built to avoid a city or other congested area
2. any system of pipes or conduits for redirecting the flow of a liquid
3. a means of redirecting the flow of a substance around an appliance through which it would otherwise pass
4. Surgery
a. the redirection of blood flow, either to avoid a diseased blood vessel or in order to perform heart surgery
b. (as modifier): bypass surgery
5. Electronics
a. an electrical circuit, esp one containing a capacitor, connected in parallel around one or more components, providing an alternative path for certain frequencies
b. (as modifier): a bypass capacitor
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

bypass

[′bī‚pas]
(civil engineering)
A road which carries traffic around a congested district or temporary obstruction.
(communications)
The use of alternative systems, such as satellite and microwave, to transmit data and voice signals, avoiding use of the communication lines of the local telephone company.
(electricity)
A shunt path around some element or elements of a circuit.
(engineering)
An alternating, usually smaller, diversionary flow path in a fluid dynamic system to avoid some device, fixture, or obstruction.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

bypass

Any device (such as a pipe or duct) for directing flow around an element instead of through it.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

bypass

In communications, to avoid the local telephone company by using satellites and microwave systems.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in periodicals archive ?
Given such overwhelming evidence the Secretary of State has now concluded not only that the bypasses would cut through an area of remarkable unspoilt countryside but, just as importantly, that the potential role of these bypasses insupporting the regeneration of the Black Country is unproven.
Income taxes paid by the trust will reduce the amount that "bypasses" the surviving spouse's estate.
A new, true flow-splitting device was recently developed to address the problems associated with bypasses that rely on a pressure drop.
RAC campaigns chief Edmund King said: "Many bypasses are long overdue." AA spokesman John Dawson added: "The Government is robbing Peter to pay Paul."
In fact, a 1987 Rand study found that 17 to 35 percent of American bypasses might be unnecessary.
At present only those needing a single vessel by-pass could have it, but the aim was to perform double and triple bypasses in the future.
The best results were seen in patients who received saphenous vein bypasses. At 5 years, the secondary patency rate in these vessels was 68%.
They randomly assigned 714 to get standard medical care and 663 to get EC/IC bypasses. The group that had the surgery subsequently had a slightly higher rate of stroke and death than the control group, according to the study, which appeared in the Nov.
Karachi Master Plan 1975-85 had proposed the Northern and Southern Bypasses to enable traffic going upcountry from Karachi Port to bypass the city and thus ease congestion and pollution.