By-product

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by-product

[′bī‚präd·əkt]
(engineering)
A product from a manufacturing process that is not considered the principal material.

By-product

Material, other than the principal product, generated as a consequence of an industrial process or as a break-down product in a living system.
References in periodicals archive ?
The highest cumulative gas production occurred with the byproduct of canola, followed to a lesser extent by the black sunflower and the forage radish.
Depending on the different oil extraction procedures, the copra byproducts can be classified into mechanically extracted copra meal (copra expellers, CE; IFN 5-01-572; AAFCO, 2016) or solvent extracted copra meal (CM; IFN 5-01-573; AAFCO, 2016).
In the green sand casting process, byproducts not destined for beneficial use historically have been considered wastes by the industry and regulatory community and disposed in landfills.
However, in contrast to our findings, these authors reported that the dietary inclusion of lentil byproduct in excess of 10% adversely affected FCR.
Since the town began using the alcohol byproduct mixture, Mr.
The technology has served as a foundation for developing a broader line of cotton byproduct hydromulches for erosion control, including a premium hydromulch for steep slopes, and more recently, a midgrade product for flat- to mid-slope terrain.
His company will handle regulations, byproduct testing, permitting and marketing to area farmers, which includes demonstrating to them that the free land application will benefit crops.
The inculcation of religious belief would be a byproduct of these other, baser, motives.
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed rules to require drinking water systems to increase protection against Cryptosporidium and expand control of disinfection byproducts.
The advantages of the two "cost reduction" methods are that (1) they are theoretically sound because they give the primary product credit for the pieces of it that were sold off or will be sold off, and (2) they de-emphasize byproducts by having no byproduct revenue reflected on the income statement.
In 2000, the average cash cost of zinc production has increased by 10% to 40[cent]/lb due to higher concentrate treatment charges and reduced byproduct credits.