By-product

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by-product

[′bī‚präd·əkt]
(engineering)
A product from a manufacturing process that is not considered the principal material.

By-product

Material, other than the principal product, generated as a consequence of an industrial process or as a break-down product in a living system.
References in periodicals archive ?
Rick Snyder has signed into law the use of coal ash and other industrial byproducts in cement and asphalt, according to Businessweek.
None of the tannin binding agents affected IVOMD and ME content of green tea byproduct, but PEG4000, 6000, and 20000 significantly increased IVOMD and ME content of black tea by-products (p < 0.
Because many plant managers don't have the time to worry about byproducts beyond just getting them out the plant door, employing the expertise of a third party professional could help alleviate the burden of byproduct management.
In early 2011, Waupaca Foundry completed construction of test pads to evaluate the long-term performance of compacted foundry byproduct as a landfill liner.
While sourced from a byproduct of cocoa production, Solbeso is not sweet nor does it taste like chocolate, but instead delivers a floral aroma and light citrus taste that is ideal straight, on the rocks or mixed into cocktails, say company officials.
Only the net proceeds received from the byproducts sold in the current period are accounted for and shown in the income statement as byproduct revenue.
The hydrogen can then be stored and later used in a fuel cell to generate electricity, with heat as a useful byproduct that could be harnessed to heat homes, among other uses.
However, they react with organic material, and the resulting byproducts have been linked to adverse health effects.
Here's what Bob says about cadmium: "In the zinc manufacturing process a toxic byproduct is generated that contains elemental cadmium.
The Global Waste Research Institute (GWRI), located in San Luis Obispo, California, is a collaborative effort between Cal Poly and industry to promote the development of sustainable waste and byproduct management technologies and advance current practices in resource management.
Microscopic results of fermented seaweeds byproduct indicate that fermentation may affect each byproduct to morphological changes to increase carbohydrate digestibility in broilers (Figure 3).