cable delay

cable delay

[′kā·bəl di′lā]
(computer science)
The time required for one bit of data to go through a cable, about 1.5 nanoseconds per foot of cable.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
As in the A032-ET a cable delay transmission line maintains the stability of the Pulse Shaper (see Fig.
These early expanders were often called converters, because they converted the downstream SCSI signaling scheme and were simply modeled in the system as a slight cable delay. It was quickly realized that while SCSI expanders did a great job of converting from one signaling domain to another, they also had the impact of greatly improving SCSI signal integrity by repeating the signal and reducing the impact of the variable bus loading, inherent with the distributed transmission line nature of parallel SCSI.
In addition, the design engineer is often forced to incorporate additional (and costly) secondary manufacturing processes, such as hand soldering, or elaborate mechanical mounting methods to ensure proper grounding of the large and bulky coaxial cable delay assembly.
The size and weight savings could be several orders of magnitude compared to conventional cable delay lines, while providing the same or even better performance levels.
Cable Delay Compensator for Microwave Signal Distribution over Optical Fibers* (*) Invited Paper
The numerator represents the required [S.sub.21] parameter plus the cable delays. The denominator represents an error term, which can be drawn graphically, as shown in Figure A2.