cadmium oxide


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cadmium oxide

[′kad·mē·əm ′äk‚sīd]
(inorganic chemistry)
CdO In the cubic form, a brown, amorphous powder, insoluble in water, soluble in acids and ammonia salts; used for cadmium plating baths and in the manufacture of paint pigments.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dimethylcadmium, however, requires a fairly large footprint of a spill before its natural oxidation in air generates enough heat to hit autoignition, and when it does, assuming you survived the blast, the combustion byproduct of cadmium oxide dispersed through the air in a haze is almost as bad as the dimethyl.
Thermal decomposition process can be regarded as an alternative technique for the synthesis of cadmium oxide nanomaterials since it is fast, free of toxic solvents, of low cost, and effective compared to the other synthetic routes.
Yakuphanoglu, "Synthesis and electro-optic properties of nanosized-boron doped cadmium oxide thin films for solar cell applications," Solar Energy, vol.
A conventional three electrode cell was employed throughout the experiments, with bare or cadmium oxide nanoparticles modified carbon paste electrode (3.0 mm diameter) as a working electrode, and all potentials reported here were referred to this electrode, a saturated calomel electrode (SCE) as a reference electrode which all potentials were reported with respect to this reference, and a platinum electrode as a counter electrode.
In both humans and animals, mild to moderate pulmonary fibrosis has been documented with chronic inhalation exposure to cadmium oxide and cadmium sulfide (ATSDR 1999).
When you solder, that cadmium vaporizes into fine cadmium oxide fume, which is easily inhaled." McCann says an excess of kidney problems seems to be showing up among Native American jewelers of the Southwest.
Industrial activities such as melting, purifying of metals and incineration of municipal waste also release Cd into the atmosphere as cadmium oxide, chloride or sulfide.3 Cigarette smoking is another significant source of Cd, heavy smokers have more than double of the Cd body burden.1 People who live near the factories, which release cadmium as their waste, and those working in the metal refinery industry, suffer from health problems such as air way diseases, gastrointestinal problems, bone fractures, renal failure, infertility and carcinomas.
Often a little cadmium oxide is added to the flux to stabilise the colour.
Oponents of cadmium use in plastics--groups such as the Natural Resources Defense Council, the Environmental Defense Fund and the International Chemical Workers Union--say incinerator ash buried in landfills across the nation contains highly toxic cadmium oxide deposits left when the plastic compounds are burned.