cespitose

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cespitose

[′ses·pə‚tōs]
(botany)
Tufted; growing in tufts, as grass.
Having short stems forming a dense turf.
References in periodicals archive ?
Briske, "Below-ground carbon and nitrogen accumulation in perennial grasses: a comparison of caespitose and rhizomatous growth forms," Plant and Soil, vol.
Plant mass formed by entangled filaments, caespitose; main filament and branches similar or with slightly distinct in diameter; filaments uniseriate, 7.0-15.0(-17.5) [micro]m wide; branches usually on one side of the filament; sheath thin to moderately thick, hyaline to yellowish brown; trichomes constricted, 5.0-13.0 [micro]m wide; cells 4.0-10.0(-12.0) [micro]m long, 0.4-1.5 times longer than wide; cell content granulated, blue-green; heterocytes not abundant, 6.09.3um long, 5.5-6.8um wide.
and 0.5 cm tall, which can be caespitose; laciniae flat, richly dichotomously branched, distal parts fanshaped branched; these distal parts, which do not twist or do it slightly, have granular soralia on the tips.
Plants from the type locality have caespitose stems, linear, weakly plicate pinnae, single inflorescences, and spiny pollen, whereas plants from two different localities north and south of the type locality have solitary stems, narrowly cuneate, strongly plicate pinnae, multiple inflorescences and pollen without spines.
Some prefer a moist soil, including the tufted hair grass, Deschampsia caespitose, and another of my favourites, the Japanese blood grass Red Baron (Imperata cylindrical).
It grows on very shallow soil, is caespitose, and has simple inflorescences.
Phenotypic selection within each cycle centered on those genotypes with the caespitose growth habit rather than spreading genotypes.
ramosa due to its caespitose form, however height was the best predictor in this analysis.
Caespitose (tuft-forming) seaweeds are ubiquitous in the intertidal environment, and in the lower levels the most conspicuous seaweeds are rhodophyceans of the genus Laurencia, although there are also phaeophytes of the genera Ectocarpus and Chnoospora, in addition to highly-branched chlorophytes of the genera Cladophora and Chaetomorpha.