CAJOLE

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CAJOLE

(language)
(Chris And John's Own LanguagE) A dataflow language developed by Chris Hankin <clh@doc.ic.ac.uk> and John Sharp at Westfield College.

["The Data Flow Programming Language CAJOLE: An Informal Introduction", C.L. Hankin et al, SIGPLAN Notices 16(7):35-44 (Jul 1981)].
References in periodicals archive ?
One story claims the word blarney gained popularity as a word for flattery after Queen Elizabeth I of England used it to describe the flowery (but apparently less than honest) cajolery of Cormac MacCarthy, who was then the lord of Blarney Castle.
campaign contributions and career civil servants through cajolery,
Page [Cambridge: Harvard UP, 1959], Amidtia 22 83.191) and that the antithesis of friendship is "fawning cajolery, or flattery" (24 91-93.199).
Ulfkotte detailed the pattern of cajolery and outright bribery used by the CIA and other US-allied intelligence agencies, for the purpose of advancing political agendas.
To sell their products advertisers have to resort to all kinds of cajolery so as to attract their target audience.
It is a plan that, through bullying and cajolery and for want of a more compelling alternative, could actually be realised.
Using a mixture of flattery, humor, cajolery, and sarcasm, she offers sympathy for his illness and suggestions for how to reduce his workload while firmly stating her intentions and protecting her own schedule.
House Republicans have been stalwart in their rejection of amnesty, despite the cajolery of both George W.
Albert Alschuler has referred to pretrial conferences as "Cajolery Conferences," (204) and he has cautioned that "a judge who has gained familiarity with the facts of a case during his pretrial activities is unlikely to relish the prospect of hearing the evidence again at trial." (205) Judith Resnik has pointed to the danger that, in a judicially supervised settlement negotiation, "litigants who incur a judge's displeasure may suffer judicial hostility or even vengeance with little hope of relief." (206) Owen Fiss has described the settlement of civil suits in circumstances of coercion as "the civil analogue of plea bargaining." (207) Fiss has worried that in civil cases "[c]onsent is often coerced," (208) but he has not developed the claim.
Further evidence that this was no co-ordinated, politically driven, anti-government protest came from the three West Midlands councils among the 35, each deciding to reject the Government's cash and cajolery in its distinctive way.
From there, he sorted it all out with a mixture of personal terrorism, cajolery, and adroit manipulation of parliamentary rules.
Moreover,-particularly when there is a preexisting relationship between the defendant and the declarant, the lower courts recognize that the defendant's actions need not be threatening in order to influence the declarant: cajolery can be as powerful a tool.