calcarenite


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calcarenite

[kal·kə′rē‚nīt]
(petrology)
A type of limestone or dolomite composed of coral or shell sand or of sand formed by erosion of older limestones, with particle size ranging from ¹⁄₁₆ to 2 millimeters.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Two RC holes at Dixie intersected thick, vertically-continuous zones of gold mineralization hosted in pervasively altered and variably oxidized Pennsylvanian-Permian debris flow conglomerate and calcarenite - - the same host section as the Dark Star deposit approximately four km to the north.
A few Upper Jurassic Weimei formations composed of fine-grained metamorphic quartzose sandstone, silty slate, and calcarenite as well as Quaternary sediments distributed along valleys also crop out in the orefield (Figure 2(a)) [7].
[5] investigated the effect of temperature ranging from 105[degrees]C to 600[degrees]C on the uniaxial compressive strength, modulus of elasticity, and Poisson's ratio as well as other mechanical properties of calcarenite. Otto and Kempka [6] concluded that the change in permeability associated with the thermomechanical properties of rocks is negligible during underground coal gasification.
The eastern Yingshan Formation's top surface mainly presents high-energy particle and dust-grain limestone beach facies, mainly based on a thick layer of sparry calcarenite and micrite interbeds.
All standing stones were made from limestone, except for 3, which were made from highly degraded sandstone and calcarenite. Three standing stones were 1.20 m high, another dozen were 75 cm, but the rest were diminutive because of fragmentation and changes caused by crypto-corrosion (Fig.
(2011) Application of the needle penetration test to a calcarenite, Maastricht, the Netherlands.
In this area the main outcropping formation is the Calcarenite di Marsala, which has been exploited for a long time as building stone.
The structures range in size from 1 to 40 cm and generally occur in calcarenite, sand, and silt (Figures 3(a) and 3(b)).