calciferous


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Related to calciferous: calciferol, calcareous, Cruciferous vegetables

calciferous

[kal′sif·ə·rəs]
(biology)
Containing or producing calcium or calcium carbonate.
References in periodicals archive ?
Calciferous glands (difficult to see in type material; not present in comparative material, having been removed by Michaelsen (1918: 331-332) for a study with its particular description): Half-globular in 9-10; closely connected to oesophagus; dorsally and ventrally separated.
Many studies have demonstrated a link between breast cancer prevention and increased consumption of calciferous vegetables and antioxidant-rich foods.
Her image was shaped from thousands of tiny pieces of smalta, calciferous glass melted in a special way.
This is achieved by the action of the worm's calciferous gland and the buffering action of carbonic acid (Lawrence and London, 1997).
General effects reported rang from loss of appetite, poor food efficiency, reduced gut absorption enlarged liver, kidney and lung, fatty hepatic necrosis, haemolysis, calciferous myocardial lesions and even death (Oyewole & Olayinka, 2007).
Yet despite transmigrasi, there has been no wholesale conversion to irrigation-based wet-rice production; Timorese soils, as observed above, are in most areas calciferous and loamy and thus unsuitable for ploughing, and if local myth is any indication, the habits of swidden are deeply rooted in local psyches.
The soils are fertile, especially at lower altitudes, because the crumbling substance originating from the calciferous bedrock (diabase-rich or siliceous rocks, i.e., granite-gneisses and quartzites; Piirainen et al.
And in Springs and Rocks, 1995, twelve jagged, calciferous stones quarried from the hole-riddled bedrock upon which much of Paris sits (in places unstably) were each bolted to a spring cable so that they dangled nearly to the floor like antitrophies (a negation of the apostles, the months in the calendar, the notes in an octave, the sign of the zodiac, and so on), as if playing an underworld role opposite Solarium's materialization of warmth.
It has been shown at Biosphere 2 that such changes lead to a reduction in carbonate fixation among calciferous organisms like corals: doubling the C[O.sub.2] in the air would reduce the rate of coral growth by about 40 percent.
My brother and I used to collect these calciferous remnants of sea creatures long, long past in sandwich bags and try to sell them to the next-door neighbours for two pence a throw.