arteriolopathy

(redirected from calcific uremic arteriolopathy)
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arteriolopathy

[är‚tir·ē·ə′läp·ə·thē]
(medicine)
Disease of the arterioles.
References in periodicals archive ?
Calciphylaxis or calcific uremic arteriolopathy (CUA) is a term that refers to the deposition of calcium in small and medium vessels of the skin that can result in thrombosis and necrosis of the skin, subcutaneous fat, and muscle.
Calciphylaxis or calcific uremic arteriolopathy (CUA) is a rare and severe disorder characterized by systemic medial calcification of arteries and arterioles that leads to skin and soft tissues ischemic necrosis with the development of ulcers (1).
Calcific uremic arteriolopathy can be characterized by obstructive vasculopathy, with calcification of small arteries and arterioles resulting in luminal occlusion and subsequently cutaneous necrosis [1].
Calcific uremic arteriolopathy (CUA), otherwise termed calciphylaxis, characteristically arises in the setting of end stage renal failure and hyperparathyroidism.
Calciphylaxis, or calcific uremic arteriolopathy, is a rare but morbid condition resulting from medial calcification of arterioles and leading to ischemia and resultant necrosis [1, 2].
Calcific uremic arteriolopathy. Pathophysiology, reactive oxygen species and therapeutic approaches.
Calcific uremic arteriolopathy is a condition characterized by obstructive vasculopathy, with calcification of small arteries and arterioles resulting in luminal occlusion and subsequent cutaneous necrosis.
Dymock et al., "Cutaneous necrosis from calcific uremic arteriolopathy," American Journal of Kidney Diseases, vol.
Calciphylaxis, also known as calcific uremic arteriolopathy (CUA), has been reported to occur in 1% to 4.5% of patients in dialysis [1] and represents a severe complication of end-stage renal disease.
Calcific uremic arteriolopathy, more commonly referred to as calciphylaxis, is a vasculopathy, which presents as calcification of arteries and soft tissues and resulting skin and fat necrosis.