callus

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callus:

see corns and callusescorns and calluses,
thickenings of the outer layer of skin where there is irritation or constant pressure. Corns are cone-shaped with their points protruding into the dermis, or inner layer of skin. They usually have hard, shiny surfaces surrounded by red, painful areas.
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Callus

 

(1) Tissue formed in plants on the surface of a wound (cracks, taps, the bases of cuttings, and areas of concrescence of stock and scion). A callus promotes the healing of wounds. Consisting of thin-walled parenchymal cells, a callus develops when there is cell division of any living tissue of the plant (cambium or phloem) in the peripheral zone of the pith, lying next to the protoxylem. Adventitious roots and buds, particularly with grafting, often develop in the callus. (2) Corpus callosum, an accumulation of callóse that obstructs the sieve plate when the sieve tubes of the phloem age. Use of the term in this sense is obsolete.


Callus

 

a thickening of the horny layer of skin as a result of constant pressure or friction. Calluses usually appear on the palms, soles, and other parts of the body that are in constant contact with tough surfaces. The cracks formed on the surface of a callus may hinder one’s ability to work, and they can also be portals of entry for pyogenic microbes, resulting in such conditions as erysipelatous inflammations and phlegmons.

callus

[′kal·əs]
(botany)
A thickened callose deposit on sieve plates.
A hard tissue that forms over a damaged plant surface.
(medicine)
Hard, thick area on the surface of the skin.

callus

1. an area of skin that is hard or thick, esp on the palm of the hand or sole of the foot, as from continual friction or pressure
2. an area of bony tissue formed during the healing of a fractured bone
3. Botany
a. a mass of hard protective tissue produced in woody plants at the site of an injury
b. an accumulation of callose in the sieve tubes
4. Biotechnology a mass of undifferentiated cells produced as the first stage in tissue culture
References in periodicals archive ?
2000) Preliminary investigation of debridement of plantar callosities in rheumatoid arthritis.
In addition to the callosities, some of the whales--quite a few of them, I was noticing--had those scorings scattered across their, bodies.
The Whale Caller is able to distinguish Sharisha from other whales: "he enjoys watching Sharisha in the broad smile that displays the baleen that looks like teeth" (128) and she has very specific callosities "distinctively shaped like the Three Sisters Hills of the Karoo (36).
They are indigenous to Africa, Asia, and extreme southern Europe (introduced to Gibraltar) and some possess ischial callosities for sitting.
39) The most famous expression of the markings that a man's occupation leaves on his body is found in A Study in Scarlet: "By a man's finger-nails, by his coat-sleeve, by his boot, by his trouser knees, by the callosities of his forefinger and thumb, by his expression, by his shirt cuffs--by each of these things a man's calling is plainly revealed" (Doyle 1986, 15).
The study of the footprints and natural casts reveals: tracks of feet with impressions of 3 decreasing nails I to III, going towards outside the track, and with two semicircular marks corresponding to the callosities of digits IV and V; and those horseshoe handed ones, with a very reduced mark of digit I.
Aperture wider than higher, diagonal, without callosities in the parietal union; peristoma sharp, keel-like resembling a siphostoma.
Conditions such as hammertoe of the second toe, metatarsalgia of the lesser MTP joints, plantar surface keratoses, and callosities can be present.
A horrible bogey-ridden, demon-haunted time it was to me and then one has not the fortitude, or callosities perhaps, with which to deal with it.