call

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call,

in finance, see: puts and callsputs and calls,
in securities trading. A call is a contract that gives the holder the right to purchase a given stock at a specific price within a designated period of time.
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call

[kȯl]
(computer science)
To transfer control to a specified closed subroutine.
A statement in a computer program that references a closed subroutine or program.

call

1. Hunting any of several notes or patterns of notes, blown on a hunting horn as a signal
2. Hunting
a. an imitation of the characteristic cry of a wild animal or bird to lure it to the hunter
b. an instrument for producing such an imitation
3. Brit the summons to the bar of a student member of an Inn of Court
4. Theatre a notice to actors informing them of times of rehearsals
5. (in square dancing) an instruction to execute new figures
6. Commerce
a. a demand for repayment of a loan
b. (as modifier): call money
7. Billiards a demand to an opponent to say what kind of shot he will play
8. Poker a demand for a hand or hands to be exposed
9. Bridge a bid, or a player's turn to bid
10. Sport a decision of an umpire or referee regarding a shot, pitch, etc.
11. Business on call
a. (of a loan, etc.) repayable on demand
b. available to be called for work outside normal working hours

call

(1) In programming, a statement that requests services from another subroutine or program. The call is physically made to the subroutine by a branch instruction or some other linking method that is created by the assembler, compiler or interpreter. The routine that is called is responsible for returning control to the calling program after it has finished processing. See stack.

(2) In communications, the action taken by the transmitting station to establish a connection with the receiving station in a dial-up network.
References in classic literature ?
Often you stop when you have run about half-way down it, and then you are lost, but there is another little wooden house near here, called the Lost House, and so you tell the man that you are lost and then he finds you.
In this first lecture I shall be concerned to refute a theory which is widely held, and which I formerly held myself: the theory that the essence of everything mental is a certain quite peculiar something called "consciousness," conceived either as a relation to objects, or as a pervading quality of psychical phenomena.
Another sort of quality is that in virtue of which, for example, we call men good boxers or runners, or healthy or sickly: in fact it includes all those terms which refer to inborn capacity or incapacity.
I mean that when you see a Woman, you ought -- besides inferring her breadth -- to see her length, and to SEE what we call her HEIGHT; although that last Dimension is infinitesimal in your country.
After we passed this mighty nothing, called a wall, something like the Picts' walls so famous in Northumberland, built by the Romans, we began to find the country thinly inhabited, and the people rather confined to live in fortified towns, as being subject to the inroads and depredations of the Tartars, who rob in great armies, and therefore are not to be resisted by the naked inhabitants of an open country.
In the course of his march, therefore, he secretly detached a small party of trappers, to make their way to those hunting grounds, while he continued on with the main body; appointing a rendezvous, at the next full moon, about the 28th of August, at a place called the Medicine Lodge.
In the provision they made for me, it was my good hap to be put to nurse, as they call it, to a woman who was indeed poor but had been in better circumstances, and who got a little livelihood by taking such as I was supposed to be, and keeping them with all necessaries, till they were at a certain age, in which it might be supposed they might go to service or get their own bread.
Culture, they call their theft--and everything becometh sickness and trouble unto them!
Having got a name for his horse so much to his taste, he was anxious to get one for himself, and he was eight days more pondering over this point, till at last he made up his mind to call himself "Don Quixote," whence, as has been already said, the authors of this veracious history have inferred that his name must have been beyond a doubt Quixada, and not Quesada as others would have it.
It will be simplest for us to call them all Celts and to divide them into two families, the Gaels and the Cymry.
"Think of yourself, shipwrecked, called by your rescuers 'Mrs.
Indeed, if this may be called a kind of dishonesty, it seems the more inexcusable, from the apparent openness and explicit sincerity of the other lady.--But so it was.