calotype


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Related to calotype: Collodion process

calotype

[′kal·ə‚tīp]
(graphic arts)
An obsolete method of photography in which paper is treated with silver iodide, silver nitrate, and acetic and gallic acids; after exposure the paper is developed in a solution of silver nitrate and gallic acid.
References in periodicals archive ?
Photography in Edinburgh in the early days now seems to be dominated by the productive partnership between the painter Hill and the chemist Adamson, but there were other early exponents of the calotype.
But he became increasingly unhappy with the poor definition of calotype photographs and by the long exposures required and in 1848 invented the wet collodion process.
The wet-collodion process allowed for quicker exposure times than its predecessors, making it a more ideal process for capturing scenes related to war--even if not the battles themselves--than its predecessors the Daguerreotype or the Calotype.
A expansao do uso do calotype permitiu a muitos artistas apreender aspectos da paisagem--e assim desenvolver um pensamento fotografico especifico sobre a natureza, na medida em que extrapolavam as condicoes da pintura e do desenho.
The exhibition's interactive elements are particularly engaging: they range from the chance to create an image of a natural object and watch it fade, as the earliest calotype photographs frustratingly did, to stereoscopes showing sharply three-dimensional Victorian views.
While he still wears a sash, there are few similarities between this calotype and the three others.
These include the early daguerrotype (a negative image on metal) and calotype (on paper).
En efecto con la reproduccion en papel (el calotype se utiliza paralelamente al daguerreotype desde 1850), una difusion mas ampliada de imagenes se hace posible, corroborando y diciendo "de veras" lo que dibujos y pinturas habian contribuido a mostrar, yendo hasta influenciar la practica del retrato fotografico.
With the arrival of the calotype process (patent from 1841) the development of black and white (B&W) negative-positive system began and, as a portrait technique, is still present, especially in the area of art gallery photography.
In Britain, William Henry Fox Talbot developed a method of capturing images on paper that had been treated by chemicals, an approach called the calotype that led to the making of negatives, which is the focus of a major exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.
Despite Tripe's harsh judgement of his own work, the resultant salted paper prints from calotype negatives were received favourably by his contemporaries (7), and are still renowned for their grainy texture and beautiful purplish-pinkish black hues.
The calotype uses paper, sensitized with silver iodide, to produce a negative image that is then transferred to a second paper sheet to make the positive print.