calx


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calx

[kalks]
(inorganic chemistry)
References in periodicals archive ?
According to Hutton, he ''cut and polished some cinders from the calx of the Aston furnace, set them in rings and brooches, calling them fragments of Pompey's Pillar, and sold a large number of them before the imposition was detected'.'.
"Our EPON solutions not only deliver more bandwidth but are also priced significantly lower than the current GPON and GEPON based solutions offered today by Alcatel- Lucent (ALU), Calix (CALX), Ciena (CIEN), and Cisco Systems (CSCO).
He previously invested in Calix (CALX), CYA Technologies (acquired by enChoice), eMedicine (acquired by WebMD), Ideal Image (acquired by Steiner Leisure Limited STNR), Oncogenex (OGXI), OptXcon (acquired by Optical Solutions), Optical Solutions (acquired by Calix) and Savvion (acquired by Progress Software).
Etymology: From Latin calx (lime) and cola (an inhabitant); referring to its occurrence in calcium-rich habitats.
Calix's stock will be traded on the New York bourse under the symbol CALX.
Mandibula derecha, similar a la izquierda pero con dos dientes en el area incisiva, diente apical ([S.sub.1]+[S.sub.2]), triangular prominente, diente contiguo ([S.sub.3]) redondeado, separado por muesca escisorial amplia; area molar con el primer molar (M1) poco desarrollado, M2 mas desarrollado y calx prominente (Figura 4B, C y D).
Part Three: Dissolving Spirits and Softened Calx and Borax and Salt
Apart from two marginal notes on clay seal stamps in Cicero's works (Lenz, 1861) and a few passages in Cato's (234-149 B.C.) De re rustica (also called De Agricultura), where he mentions broken stone (cementum) and lime (calx or calx cocta) as building materials, tiles (tegulae), quartz pebbles (silex), the preparation of lime by calcination in a furnace (fornax calcaria), loam (lutum) and the use of chalky earth or red ochre (terra cretosa vel rubricosa) for wall paints (Cato, 2008; Lenz, 1861), the first important Roman author treating earths and clays in greater detail is Vitruvius (1st century B.C.).