calyx

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calyx

(kā`lĭks): see sepalsepal,
a modified leaf, part of the outermost of the four groups of flower parts. The sepals of a flower are collectively called the calyx and act as a protective covering of the inner flower parts in the bud. Sepals are usually green, but in some flowers (e.g.
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.

Calyx

 

the aggregate of usually green outer leaflets, or sepals, surrounding the corolla in flowers having a double perianth. The sepals are separate or fused.

The biological purpose of the calyx is to protect the flower’s internal organs and the developing fruit and to ensure supplementary feeding. In a few plants (Hydrangea, Erica, and some Ranunculaceae) the calyx is large and brightly colored and serves, instead of a corolla (which is either absent or underdeveloped), to attract insects. In some plants (Papaver) the calyx falls off when the flower opens; in others (Ranunculus) it falls off after the completion of flowering. In the majority of plants, however, the calyx remains after flowering and may even proliferate and participate in fruit formation. In Umbelliferae, Compositae, and some other plants the calyx is completely reduced or converted into hairs.

calyx

[′kā‚liks]
(botany)
The outermost whorl of a flower; composed of sepals.
(engineering)
A steel tube that is a guide rod and is also used to catch cuttings from a drill rod. Also known as bucket; sludge barrel; sludge bucket.
(invertebrate zoology)
A cup-shaped structure to which the arms are attached in crinoids.
(medicine)
A cuplike structure.
In the kidney, a collecting structure extending from the renal pelvis.

calyx

An ornament resembling the outer protective covering of a flower; found, for example, in the Corinthian capital.

calyx

1. the sepals of a flower collectively, forming the outer floral envelope that protects the developing flower bud
2. any cup-shaped cavity or structure, esp any of the divisions of the human kidney (renal calyx) that form the renal pelvis
References in periodicals archive ?
There was a significant difference in fragrance between calyces and corollae in the wider samples of both study populations (P [less than] 0.001 in both populations; Mann-Whitney test; two-tailed).
- Gas chromatograms revealed peaks characteristic of the calyces and other peaks with greater areas in the corollae than in the calyces [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 2 OMITTED].
Similar to the investigations which help in the access of calyces, other preparations for PCNL patients include, urine culture and sensi-tivity, any urinary tract infection found is treated with oral antibiotics as per culture sensitivity.
The configuration of calyces may be different at upper or lower poles.
The remaining renal calyce calculi were treated using the same method, and finally stone fragments were simultaneously sucked out via the original standard channel through nephroscope.
In Salvia, ombrohydrochory occurs when raindrops strike the calyces containing the mericarps.
It is used as a beverage, where the dried calyces are soaked in water to prepare a colorful and tasty cold drink.
Roselle calyces are the most exploited part of the plant by many countries around the world for human consumption, where the leaf and stem have been traditionally ignored, especially in Africa where the plant is grown widely for tea consumption (Villani et al., 2013).
In folk medicine, an infusion from the calyces is used as a diuretic and to treat gastrointestinal disorders, liver diseases, fever, hypercholesterolemia, and hypertension (Monroy-Ortiz and Castillo-Espana, 2007).
For calyceal anatomy major calyces were counted in every renal unit.
Probably native to tropical Central and West Africa, roselle is mainly cultivated in tropical and subtropical regions of the world (Tindall, 1986; Allel, 2003) for its attractive edible calyces (Purseglove, 1991).
Cuplike calyces containing U-shaped guts and ringed by tentacles are borne on stalks arising from prostrate stolons.