camellia


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camellia

(kəmēl`yə) [for G. J. Kamel, a Moravian Jesuit missionary], any plant of the genus Camellia in the teatea,
tree or bush, its leaves, and the beverage made from these leaves. The plant (Camellia sinensis, Thea sinensis, or C. thea) is an evergreen related to the camellia and indigenous to Assam (India) and probably to parts of China and Japan.
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 family, evergreen shrubs or small trees native to Asia but now cultivated extensively in warm climates and in greenhouses for their showy white, red, or variegated blossoms and glossy, dark-green foliage. The tea plant is Camellia sineusis. Several species yield oil from the seeds, e.g., the widely cultivated C. japonica (commonly called japonica) and C. sasanqua and, especially, the Asian C. oleifera, the source of tea-seed oil used in textile and soap manufacture and, when suitably refined, for cooking. C. oleifera has also been used to develop cold-hardy hybrid flowering camellias. Camellias are classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Theales, family Theaceae.

Camellia

 

a genus of evergreen shrubs or trees of the family Theaceae. The simple, alternate leaves are on short leaf stalks. The large, solitary flowers are white or red. There are five or more petals and many stamens. The common camellia (Camellia japonica) and its hybrid forms have single or double odorless flowers and are raised outdoors in the Caucasus and southern Crimea and indoors (often in greenhouses). The plants of this genus are propagated by cuttings and seeds. Tea is made from the young shoots of the species C. sinensis and C. assamica. The leaves of the tea oil tree (C. sasanqua), which is native to Japan and China, yield an essential oil containing 97 percent eugenol, a valuable disinfectant used in dentistry. Species are grown in the Black Sea regions of the Caucasus.

REFERENCE

Sealy, J. R. A Revision of the Genus Camellia. London, 1958.

camellia

of Alabama. [Flower Symbolism: Golenpaul, 625]

camellia

any ornamental shrub of the Asian genus Camellia, esp C. japonica, having glossy evergreen leaves and showy roselike flowers, usually white, pink or red in colour: family Theaceae
References in periodicals archive ?
With regard to the leaf drop, although they are evergreen plants, camellias still periodically shed their old leaves.
Margaret Greene, by email: I think the single camellias are much easier to get to root.
But it wasn't really until Victorian times, in that great age of plant exploration, that gardeners discovered the delights of the ornamental camellia.
Ideally you should plant your camellia in a well-drained, moisture-retentive acidic soil with plenty of organic matter.
White camellia seed oil is sourced from the same trees that produce the leaves used for white, green and black teas found throughout China and Japan.
Julie Hewett 100% Organic Camellia Oil is paraben-free, cruelty-free, gluten-free and certified USDA organic.
Camellia worked nights, so Todd looked after Marcus and their other two brothers until he died.
Camellias are typically reliable in the Virginia Beach region, so I suspect that other factors are making the camellia more susceptible--much like you are more likely to catch the flu when tired.
His preference for a home for his wife, daughter, and niece is the lovely bayou plantation home called Camellia Creek.
The medical hub named Camellia Institute of Medical Science & Research will have a 500-bed super-speciality hospital and is expected to generate employment for about 500 people in a phased manner
2 CAMELLIA SASANQUA blooms in the fall and early winter before the ravages of winter arrive in earnest.
THE letter by John Wolfenden (DP, Mar 12), describing how the camellias planted by the late Very Rev Ingram Cleasby (as described in his Daily Post obituary) were ripped up and burned two years ago, highlights an un-Christian attitude by those in charge which beggars belief.