cane

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cane,

in botany, name for the hollow or woody, usually slender and jointed stems of plants (particularly rattanrattan
, name for a number of plants of the genera Calamus, Daemonorops, and Korthalsia climbing palms of tropical Asia, belonging to the family Palmae (palm family).
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 and other bamboos) and for various tall grasses, e.g., sugarcanesugarcane,
tall tropical perennials (species of Saccharum, chiefly S. officinarum) of the family Poaceae (grass family), probably cultivated in their native Asia from prehistoric times.
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, sorghum, and also other grasses used in the S United States for fodder. The large, or giant, cane (Arundinaria macrosperma or gigantea), a bamboobamboo,
plant of the family Poaceae (grass family), chiefly of warm or tropical regions, where it is sometimes an extremely important component of the vegetation. It is most abundant in the monsoon area of E Asia.
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 grass native to the United States, often forms impenetrable thickets 15 to 25 ft (3.6–7.6 m) high—the canebrakes of the South. The stalks are used locally for fishing poles and other purposes, and the young shoots are sometimes eaten as a potherb.

cane,

walking stick. Probably used first as a weapon, it gradually took on the symbolism of strength and power and eventually authority and social prestige. Ancient Egyptian rulers carried the symbolic staff, and in ancient Greece, some gods were represented with a staff in hand. In the Middle Ages, the long staff or walking stick was carried by pilgrims and shepherds. A scepter carried in the right hand symbolized royal power; carried in the left hand of a king the staff represented justice. The church, too, adopted the staff for its officials; the pastoral staff (crosier), which is long and has a crooked handle, symbolizes the bishop's office. The word cane was first applied to the walking stick after 1500, when bamboo was first used. After 1600 canes became highly fashionable for men. Made of ivory, ebony, and whalebone, as well as of wood, they had highly decorated and jeweled knob handles. They were often made hollow in order to carry possessions or supplies or, in some cases, to conceal a weapon. In the late 17th cent. oak sticks were extensively used, especially by the Puritans. The cane continued in men's fashions throughout the 18th cent.; as with the women's fan certain rules became standard for its use. From time to time women adopted the cane, particularly for a short time when Marie Antoinette carried the shepherd's crook. In the 19th cent. the cane became a mark of the professional man; the gold-headed cane was especially favored.

Bibliography

See K. Stein, Canes and Walking Sticks (1973).

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What does it mean when you dream about a cane?

Male sexuality. Could also indicate weakness or, alternatively, something that supports us. “Caning” is also a form of punishment.

The Dream Encyclopedia, Second Edition © 2009 Visible Ink Press®. All rights reserved.

cane

[kān]
(botany)
A hollow, usually slender, jointed stem, such as in sugarcane or the bamboo grasses.
A stem growing directly from the base of the plant, as in most Rosaceae, such as blackberry and roses.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

cane

1
1. 
a. the long jointed pithy or hollow flexible stem of the bamboo, rattan, or any similar plant
b. any plant having such a stem
2. the woody stem of a reed, young grapevine, blackberry, raspberry, or loganberry
3. any of several grasses with long stiff stems, esp Arundinaria gigantea of the southeastern US
4. See sugar cane

cane

2
Dialect a female weasel
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore the knowledge about the associations that occur among different quality traits and cane yield is important.
Once upon a time, sugar cane growing in Kenya was an easy and lucrative trade.
Whether you call the newcomers everbearing, fall-bearing, or primocane-bearing, they produce fruit on first-year canes, not on second-year canes like the older varieties.
She argued that even with white canes the blind and partially sighted persons faced challenges such as lack of safe and accessible urban spaces that are user-friendly as well as tactile markers that facilitate the use of white canes.
Prop up the card with the written name on your candy cane stand.
Cut out old canes Where space is limited, the easiest way is to keep the new canes vertical in a bundle in the middle of the old canes, which are on the lawn to reduce stress levels.
TIME FOR A WALK A watch cane dating from the 1890s for the gent who always likes to be on time
An ivory-topped for the gambler, containing three dice A CHANCE to examine a number of collectors' canes and many more delightful antiques and works of art will be at the inaugural Bruton Decorative Antiques Fair, Somerset, which runs from October 14-16.
Having one's long cane get stuck may cause more frequent stops and starts, thereby increasing the time required to complete a given route.
Kendall's signature on the ADM denotes the Navy's and the Defense Department's confidence in and support of CANES. The decision also transferred oversight of the program from the Department of Defense to the Department of the Navy.