canine

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canine

1. of, relating to, or belonging to the Canidae, a family of mammals, including dogs, jackals, wolves, and foxes, typically having a bushy tail, erect ears, and a long muzzle: order Carnivora (carnivores)
2. of or relating to any of the four teeth, two in each jaw, situated between the incisors and the premolars
3. a canine tooth

canine

Any member of the dog family, including wolves and foxes.
See also: Ornament

canine

[′kā‚nīn]
(anatomy)
A conical tooth, such as one located between the lateral incisor and first premolar in humans and many other mammals. Also known as cuspid.
(vertebrate zoology)
Pertaining or related to dogs or to the family Canidae.
References in periodicals archive ?
4) presented three incisor teeth and one canine tooth on each side which was similar to the findings in leopard (Kalita et al, 2001) and in tiger (Joshi).
Canine Tooth Sendromu ilk olarak Knapp (1) tarafindan troklea bolgesine lokal travma alan bir olguda superior oblik restriksiyonu sonucu paradoksal olarak gozun adduksiyonda elevasyon kisitliligi olarak tanimlanmistir.
They placed miniscrews between the lower canine and the first lower premolar teeth and secured the miniscrew into the lower canine tooth. The first upper molar distalization of 1.45 mm was observed with the FRD appliance; however, the first upper molar distalization of approximately 2.11 mm was observed in the screwed-FRD appliance.
In one analysis by Holan and Mamber [8], 59 children who were suspected to have had their primary canine tooth buds extirpated were examined clinically to assess the long-term consequences.
The etiology of canine tooth impaction: a space analysis.
Numerous angry moggies and the occasional canine tooth have left their permanent mark.
* Push his lip under his canine tooth as he bites so he bites himself.
In 2004, an Icelandic geologist found a rare, well-preserved, 110,000-to-130,000-year-old, fossil jawbone and canine tooth in the Svalbard archipelago of Norway.
PIECES OF APE In February 2006, a field assistant working with fossil hunters in Ethiopia's Chorora Formation, a series of sediment layers dated at between 10 million and 11 million years old, found an ape's canine tooth. One year later, the researchers returned to the site and found eight more teeth from the same ancient-ape species, which they dubbed Chororapithecus abyssinicus.

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