cannonball

(redirected from cannonballs)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

cannonball

1. Tennis
a. a very fast low serve
b. (as modifier): a cannonball serve
2. a jump into water by a person who has his arms tucked into the body to form a ball
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

cannonball

[′kan·ən‚bȯl]
(ordnance)
A missile that is spheroidal in shape and fired from a cannon.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to UFOlogist Scott Waring, the rock is too perfect to not be regarded as an actual cannonball. Waring said that the rock is the same size as a softball and that it is made of actual metal. 
Our demolitions ranges were an ideal location to dispose of these cannonballs."
The roughly 12-inch cannonball was buried under a sand berm and the state police bomb squad conducted a controlled detonation at about noon Thursday.
Joe was looking forward to seeing the human cannonball and he absolutely loves stuff like this, so it's brilliant."
"The very compact galaxies here are essentially like little cannonballs," said Stockton.
The human cannonball actually stands on a movable platform tucked inside the bottom of the cannon's chamber.
Perhaps Arthur Saltzman's essay, "In Praise of Pointlessness," best sums up this issue, if not the very focus of Lilies and Cannonballs Review.
Constitution, constructed from live oak timbers, made a name for itself during the War of 1812 when British cannonballs bounced off its sides, earning it the nickname "Old Ironsides." The trees also provided natural "knees," joining the ship's hull to its decking.
An expert from the trust confirmed they were not from Henry VIII's flagship that sank in the Solent in 1545 but probably 18th or 19th century cannonballs recovered from the shores of the River Hamble in Hampshire.
Even the earliest known examples of the genre were contrived; American Civil War lensmen like Matthew Brady and Alexander Gardner weren't above scattering a few cannonballs or moving bodies to more dramatic settings.
In this documentary we also meet the Smiths from Missouri, who have made being human cannonballs their business.
AVOID 'EM IF: You like doing cannonballs off the high dive, need support or have a little brother who likes to pull things ...