canonicity


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canonicity

(theory, jargon)
The extent to which something is canonical.
References in periodicals archive ?
Going beyond the consolidation of repertoire, this book's welcome and engaging analyses thus position canonicity, fidelity, and the transcendent work as concepts constructed, archived, and regulated contextually.
Collins recommends we recognize that canonicity and inspiration "designate different realities." Canonicity implies a closed collection.
To maintain the focus of BML4 as a practical manual, associate editor Edward Komara addressed issues of canonicity preemptively in a 2007 article in Notes, "Culture Wars, Canonicity, and 'A Basic Music Library'" (64, no.
As a countermove, some fans who deny the canonicity of Lucas' new vision have started to edit these movies themselves to better conform to their own canonical picture (which is mostly based on the original trilogy) of the saga.
In translation studies, the idea of the canon and canonicity was introduced through polysystem theory (see Even-Zohar) and applied to the literary sphere.
Even in her marginal canonicity, her work chaffs against such paradigms and demands fresh critical attention, as these new perspectives demonstrate.
Lynn Murphy i Caroline Willners, Antonyms in English: Construais, Constructions and Canonicity Cambridge University Press, 2012.
Indeed, it is evident from many sources (TB Sanhedrin 100a; TJ Berakhot 14:15; TB Megillah 19b) that the canonicity of the Book of Esther remained uncertain.
One of the key considerations underpinning this collection is the issue of canonicity. As Ralph Hexter has pointed out in The Oxford Handbook of Medieval Latin Literature (Oxford University Press, 2011), what is considered to be the classical canon was not consistent over the centuries.
Canonicity, Setting, Wisdom in the Deuterocanonicals; proceedings
An exhibition this size seems a mark of canonicity. For a photographer whose work has often examined the peripheral, and whose technique has never really followed fashion, how does it feel to be celebrated now as so central to the tradition?
The second article in the 2011 ASLS newsletter, "A Curriculum for Scotland" by William Hershaw, comments on the debate that the Curriculum for Excellence (1) has given rise to in Scotland (2011: 6-7), and illustrates that the issue of canonicity is still a very controversial one in twenty-first century Scotland, especially in view of the fact that there is no national curriculum in Scottish schools, and that it is left to the individual teacher to choose the texts that will be studied in English classes (Preuss 2012: 80-85).