canopy

(redirected from canopies)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

canopy

1. a rooflike covering over an altar, niche, etc.
2. a roofed structure serving as a sheltered passageway or area
3. the nylon or silk hemisphere that forms the supporting surface of a parachute
4. the transparent cover of an aircraft cockpit
5. the highest level of branches and foliage in a forest, formed by the crowns of the trees
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Canopy

A decorative hood above a niche, pulpit, or stall; a covered area that extends from the wall of a building, protecting an enclosure.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Canopy

 

(protective arch), in mining, a structure that ensures safe stoping and separation of minerals from caved material. Canopies are classified according to design and function as protective shields, flexible canopies of the enclosing and partitioning types, and interlayer canopies.

The design of the protective shield and the techniques for mining thick, sharply sloping coal seams using such shields were proposed by the Soviet scientist N. A. Chinakal in 1935 and were used in the Kuznetsk Coal Basin (Kuzbas) in 1938. Sectional protective shields were widely used in the 1940’s and 1950’s. Protective shields make it possible to work the entire thickness of a seam at once. Elastic reinforced-concrete protective shields have the great strength necessary for working seams in excess of 7-10 m thick and can be used many times. The shield is made of reinforced-concrete beams or pipes; for beams longer than 6 m it is made in sections. It moves along the slope behind the advancing face by its own weight and the weight of the caved material when the pillars on which it rests along the periphery are undermined.

Flexible metal canopies were first used in the USSR in the late 1940’s for working thick seams in the Kuzbas. They were subsequently used as components in new systems for working coal seams. Beginning in the early 1960’s they were used for working metallic ore deposits. In the early 1970’s, metal canopies were replaced by polymeric types that provide greater strength and malleability, better suitability for erection, and resistance to corrosion. The flexible canopy is set on the installation level along the upper limit of the floor or subfloor to be worked and at the mediate roof.

Interlayer canopies are used as a stable support for the roof, and sometimes for a floor, when mineral deposits are mined by sluicing. They are made of a 0.3–0.6-m thick layer of rocks or minerals, and the bridging is made of concrete slabs, wood, or metal grids.

V. V. ZHUKOV

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

canopy

[′kan·ə·pē]
(aerospace engineering)
The umbrellalike part of a parachute which acts as its main supporting surface.
The overhead, transparent enclosure of an aircraft cockpit.
(forestry)
The uppermost branching and spreading layer of a forest.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

canopy

1. A decorative hood above a niche, pulpit, choir stall, or the like.
2. A covered area which extends from the wall of a building, protecting an entrance or loading dock.
3. The collective term for the upper blanket of foliage on trees.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

canopy

i. The transparent cover over the cockpit of an airplane—fixed, hinged, or sliding and sometimes jettisonable by power. It also protects the occupants from airstream. In pressurized aircraft, a canopy helps hold and maintain cockpit pressure.
ii. The umbrella-like fabric body of a parachute, which provides high air-drag when deployed. It is usually made of nylon and supports the parachutists or load during the descent. It is the main deployable body of a parachute.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
The statement added that the canopies and all structures on the causeway were insured, while reports said they were under a 30-year warranty.
Testing was done to determine how long it would take to expand and collapse the canopies and move them into and out of position on a 15 per cent grade.
These 90 measurements were part of three test cases where it was proven that they are useful when trying to detect tree canopies.
The canopies were designed, manufactured and installed s by Able Canopies, which provides a specialist service for many educational establishments.
Made with highly recycled content, the canopies are also seismically approved.
The bulk molding process is not yet approved for aircraft canopies. However, the U.S.
PLANS to remove the canopies around the outside of the Capitol shopping centre in Cardiff are set to be thrown out.
Although UV fluxes above canopies were measured in both studies, UV irradiance on plant surfaces was not assessed.
I discussed it with my pilot, and we decided to open the canopies, jump in, and then quickly shut the canopies to keep the rain out of the cockpit and its delicate electrical systems.
Little is known concerning the foraging behavior of bats above forest canopies. Although studies from other regions of North America suggest bats commonly forage above forest canopies, no studies have examined levels of foraging activity by bats above the canopy in the eastern United States.
A similar battle has disrupted the calm of Costa Rica's towering forest canopies. Canadian Darren Hreniuk, who has both a patent and a trademark on a wire, harness and pulley operation now known as a canopy tour(R), is in the process of suing at least ten operators he says copied his idea.
To test the hypothesis that habitat modification by seaweed canopies can have direct positive effects on rocky intertidal communities, we quantified habitat amelioration by Ascophyllum nodosum canopies and its consequences on understory organisms in the Gulf of Maine, USA.