capillarity


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Related to capillarity: surface tension

capillarity

or

capillary action,

phenomenon in which the surface of a liquid is observed to be elevated or depressed where it comes into contact with a solid. For example, the surface of water in a clean drinking glass is seen to be slightly higher at the edges, where it contacts the glass, than in the middle. Capillarity can be explained by considering the effects of two opposing forces: adhesion, the attractive (or repulsive) force between the molecules of the liquid and those of the container, and cohesion, the attractive force between the molecules of the liquid (see adhesion and cohesionadhesion and cohesion,
attractive forces between material bodies. A distinction is usually made between an adhesive force, which acts to hold two separate bodies together (or to stick one body to another) and a cohesive force, which acts to hold together the like or unlike
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). Adhesion causes water to wet a glass container and thus causes the water's surface to rise near the container's walls. If there were no forces acting in opposition, the water would creep higher and higher on the walls and eventually overflow the container. The forces of cohesion act to minimize the surface area of the liquid (see surface tensionsurface tension,
tendency of liquids to reduce their exposed surface to the smallest possible area. A drop of water, for example, tends to assume the shape of a sphere. The phenomenon is attributed to cohesion, the attractive forces acting between the molecules of the liquid
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); when the cohesive force acting to reduce the surface area becomes equal to the adhesive force acting to increase it (e.g., by pulling water up the walls of a glass), equilibrium is reached and the liquid stops rising where it contacts the solid. In some liquid-solid systems, e.g., mercury and glass or water and polyethylene plastic, the liquid does not wet the solid, and its surface is depressed where it contacts the solid. Capillarity is one of the causes of the upward flow of water in the soil and in plants.

capillarity

[‚kap·ə′lar·əd·ē]
(fluid mechanics)
The action by which the surface of a liquid where it contacts a solid is elevated or depressed, because of the relative attraction of the molecules of the liquid for each other and for those of the solid. Also known as capillary action.

capillary action, capillarity

1.The movement of a liquid in the interstices of soil or other porous material, as a result of surface tension.
2. The phenomenon responsible for dry soil sucking up moisture above the ground water level. Also see capillary flow.

capillarity

Physics a phenomenon caused by surface tension and resulting in the distortion, elevation, or depression of the surface of a liquid in contact with a solid
References in periodicals archive ?
Due to this, the strong capillarity and attrite forces and the constant shocks generated amongst particles restrain their movement.
Hopper, "Stokes flow of a cylinder and half-space driven by capillarity," Journal of Fluid Mechanics, vol.
Bokan-Bosilikov, "Capillarity tests on historic mortar samples extracted from site methodology and compared results," in Proceedings of the 13th International Brick and Block Masonry Conference, Amsterdam, Netherlands, July 2004.
The correlations between the levels of specific miRNAs and SFRP4 in AbdAT and measures of whole body adiposity (detected in this study) together with previous findings in the same cohort demonstrating associations among AbdAT SFRP4, circulating SFRP4, AbdAT capillarity, and whole body insulin sensitivity [11] suggest a role for abdominal fat and fat-derived miRNA-regulated SFRP4 in the modulation of systemic insulin sensitivity/resistance.
Tabuchi, "Infiltration and capillarity in the particle packing," Records Land Reclam Res., vol.
Electrospinning Wet spinning Regular fiber and pore Irregular fiber and pore structures structures Narrow distribution of fiber Broad distribution of fiber and pore diameters and pore diameters Small pore sizes < 10 Large pore sizes > 100 [micro]m diameter [micro]m diameter Pore stability during storage Pore stability during storage requires [T.sub.g] > ambient not limited by [T.sub.g] Low capillarity and water Higher capillarity and water absorption absorption Densely packed with low Sponge-like and malleable for pliability for molding shape-forming Tended to disintegrate when Remained intact when immersed immersed in water in water Requires specialized Requires only simple apparatus apparatus
Water is getting behind the wood siding and trim via capillarity. The water can't evaporate outward through the impermeable paint film.
Other points, with respect to the axis I, relate to low-skilled teams, inadequate infrastructure, and the centralization of decision-making, forming a vicious cycle that disrupts the capillarity of the concepts and content, weakening the process of institutionalization of M&A.
Our data show that the OB group presented severe capillary rarefaction, showing 37% less capillarity compared to control.
The encapsulated catalyst within the tubes was due to capillarity action perhaps as a result of interaction between the catalyst and substrate [1].
Evidence for capillarity contributions to gecko adhesion from single spatula nanomechanical measurements.
In this case, the soil cylinder was placed on a saturated ceramic disc that, connected to a water reservoir, allowed the soil to be slowly wetted by capillarity rise.