capillary rise


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capillary rise

[′kap·ə‚ler·ē ‚rīz]
(fluid mechanics)
The rise of a liquid in a capillary tube times the radius of the tube.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dreyer, "An analytic solution of capillary rise restrained by gravity," Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, vol.
where [h.sub.c] is the height of capillary rise (m), [p.sub.c] is the capillary force expressed by the height of the water column (m), [I.sub.0] is the initial hydraulic gradient in a clay soil when bound water flows (dimensionless), D denotes the diameter of the soil particle fraction (mm), and [alpha] is a constant related to the temperature; if the temperature is 15[degrees]C, [alpha] is equal to 15 mm; if the temperature is 0[degrees] C, [alpha] is equal to 15.4 mm.
For this test, undisturbed soil samples were used in the following conditions: natural moisture; air-dried (for at least 72 hours) and pre-moistened (by capillary rise, at least for 24 hours), being confined in cylindrical PVC rings, 5 cm high and 5 cm diameter.
Even under ideal conditions, simple capillary rise would draw in nectar much more slowly, only about 36 centimeters per second, the researchers report.
in their research work pay special attention to the capillary rise of surface-active substances.
The experimental variables can be closely controlled in this technique and the capillary rise theory has been widely used in the literature with considerable exactitude.
Capillary flow is described by the capillary rise equation, which relates the height to which water will rise above a water table in unsaturated soil to the diameter of pores in the soil environment:
Capillary rise was used to determine the difference between wettability of organoclays in styrene and UP diluted with styrene.
Because of capillary rise, soil water can evaporate from the soil surface.
[1975]: 'Capillary Rise in Porous Media', Nature, 254, pp.
A series of studies have been carried out on the capillary rise; LU offered a complete analytical solution for the relationship between the rate and time of capillary rise in soils [1].
Hsu and Hilpert [29] showed that the MGAM is better than the classical GAM at describing both transient capillary rise and downward infiltration in dry sands.