capitation

(redirected from capitation fee)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal.

capitation

a tax levied on the basis of a fixed amount per head
References in periodicals archive ?
The regulations define the capitation fee as 'any kind of donation or contribution or payment, by whatever name, other than the fee approved by the Regulatory Authority'.
In 2012, PGF received Rs9.9 million as capitation fee.
3 -- Adigalar, a self-styled 'godman' of the famous Amman temple at Melvaruthur, off GST Road, was running the medical and engineering college and believed to have received huge amount as capitation fees from students for offering seats.
For each patient on their list FPs receive a capitation fee which increases with the age band (0-64, 65-74, and 75+) of the patient.
In its submission to the report of the After Hours Primary Health Care Working Party, the college suggests this could be subsidised by nurses being funded on an equivalent basis to GPs, through capitation fee or a fee for service, as well as through Accident Compensation Corporation (ACC) payments.
Your capitation fee is on the same plane as family practice and you are not perceived as a specialist.
A monthly capitation fee based on age and sex is paid to the provider who is "at risk" for office-based primary care services only.
It typically is paid by the insurance company on a discounted fee-for-service basis (as opposed to the capitation fee that HMOs receive).
If under managed care a doctor earns, say, $180 per patient per year (based on a $12-per-month capitation fee and four office visits with $10 copayments), she would have to have roughly 1,500 patients on her rolls to attain the equivalent sum--that is, 270,000 from which she would have to invest in new equipment and pay her staff, her rent, her utilities, her supplies, her professional fees, and her malpractice and other insurance.
Focusing on the capitation fee phenomenon, which has been used by various classes and social groups to strengthen their political and social base for economic gains, the author has examined nineteen privately-run professional colleges in the state of Karnataka, where this phenomenon has been widespread and where caste, class, and power combine to treat education as an enterprise.