caprylic acid


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Related to caprylic acid: capric acid

caprylic acid

[kə′pril·ik ′as·əd]
(organic chemistry)
C8H16O2 A liquid fatty acid occurring in butter, coconut oil, and other fats and oils.
References in periodicals archive ?
Glycerol (1 g) and caprylic acid (1.27 g [C.sub.8][H.sub.16][O.sub.2]) were chosen as reactants which were incubated with free lipase and its immobilized forms at 10% w/w.
Moreover, among saturated fatty acids, a study compared the effects of diets high in caprylic acid (C8:0) plus capric acid (C10:0) and diets high in lauric acid (C12:O) on lipid metabolism.
George's mushroom) and Clitocybe odora (Aniseed funnel mushroom) were reported to have 0.25 [+ or -] 0.02 and 0.03 [+ or -] 0.00% of caprylic acid, respectively, while Coprinus comatus (shaggy mane mushroom) registered 0.09 [+ or -] 0.00% of capric acid [29].
Marek et al., "In vitro inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in bovine rumen fluid by caprylic acid," Journal of Food Protection, vol.
Caprylic acid is a fatty acid naturally found in palm and coconut oils, as well as the milk of humans, cows, and goats.
Current Indian production is at that level with the two main suppliers VINS Bioproducts, Hyderabad and Bharat Serums, Mumbai, producing approximately 90% of the total using the caprylic acid fractionation method of pepsin digested anti snake venom.
2000), antioxidants and/or metal chelators with an organic biocide (Schultz and Nicholas 2001), borates and quats with an azole (Clausen and Yang 2007), lactic and acetic acids (Adams 2003), and caprylic acid and glycolic acid (Coleman 2004).
Coconut oil also contains caprylic acid and capric acid, both natural antifungals known to fight yeast overgrowth.
Caprylic acid, a nutritional supplement derived from coconut oil, kills candida cells.
Consider antifungal therapy with garlic, caprylic acid, or citrus seed extract supplements.
Camacho-Leandro [7] found a value of 53 [+ or -] 3 kJ/mol for the esterification of caprylic acid with ethylene glycol.
The levels of caprylic acid (C8:0) and capric acid (C10:0) can exceed 80% of the total fatty acids in the seed oil of some Cuphea species (Dehesh et al., 1996; Graham et al., 1981; Hilditch and Williams, 1964; van de Loo et al., 1993).