capsid

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Related to capsids: Icosahedral capsid, Capsid proteins

capsid

[′kap·səd]
(invertebrate zoology)
The name applied to all members of the family Miridae.
(virology)
In a virus, the protein shell surrounding the nucleic acid and its associated protein core. Also known as protein coat.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
They first determined that several copies of Arc self-assemble into hollow virus-like capsids and stash its own genetic material, in this case mRNA, inside them.
These viral variants could play an important role in the disease progression to FH by causing excessive accumulation of viral capsids in hepatocytes.
2010) Galaway&Stockley also showed that VLPs reassembled in vitro with the RNA bacteriophage MS2 coat protein and an RNA conjugate encompassing a siRNA and a known capsid assembly signal can be targeted to HeLa cells by protecting from nuclease.
A detailed description of the complete HIV capsid will provide a roadmap for developing drugs that can disrupt its formation and thus prevent infection by HIV.
Because ozone mainly causes capsid protein damage, viruses with different capsid protein architecture were assessed.
Then, by having the computer repeatedly shuffle those disks into arbitrary arrangements on a spherical surface, they simulated the formation of millions of hypothetical capsids.
AAV naturally exists as several different serotypes, which differ physically in the composition of their capsid proteins and genome structures.
The polyprotein subsequently undergoes cleavage mediated by a viral protease (3[C.sup.pro]), resulting in the production of four capsid proteins (VP1-4) and several nonstructural proteins.
"Although viral capsids have been used for targeted drug delivery and as a vaccine platform, they didn't evolve for that," said Baker.
"When these viruses invade cells, the capsids get taken inside and never completely break apart," said lead researcher Jane Tao, assistant professor of biochemistry and cell biology at Rice.
The study reported here looked at new molecular approaches for detecting both intact and functional virus capsids and intact and functional--that is, replicating or transcribable--nucleic acids.