Capsule

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capsule

1. a soluble case of gelatine enclosing a dose of medicine
2. a thin metal cap, seal, or cover, such as the foil covering the cork of a wine bottle
3. Botany
a. a dry fruit that liberates its seeds by splitting, as in the violet, or through pores, as in the poppy
b. the spore-producing organ of mosses and liverworts
4. Anatomy
a. a cartilaginous, fibrous, or membranous envelope surrounding any of certain organs or parts
b. a broad band of white fibres (internal capsule) near the thalamus in each cerebral hemisphere
5. an aeroplane cockpit that can be ejected in a flight emergency, complete with crew, instruments, etc.
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Capsule

 

in biology:

  1. In animals and man, the membrane surrounding various organs and their parts (for example, the kidney, liver, or joint capsules) and also pathological formations (parasites that have implanted themselves in tissue, necrotic masses, foreign bodies). A capsule is composed primarily of fibrous connective tissue and sometimes of adipose cellular tissue.
  2. The gelatinous layer around a cell characteristic of the capsulated bacteria, formed from macromolecular substances produced by these microorganisms[11–1083^]

Capsule

 

(1) A dry dehiscent fruit with many seeds (sometimes with one seed), formed of two or several carpels. Capsules dehisce by means of a lid (plantain, henbane), tiny holes (poppy, bellflower), denticles on top of the capsule (primrose, pinks), or longitudinal splits (valves) along the septum (tobacco, hellebore) or along the valves (tulip, lily, hyacinth).

(2) The spore-bearing part of the sporangium of mosses. These capsules are either cylindrical or spherical.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

capsule

[′kap·səl]
(aerospace engineering)
A small, sealed, pressurized cabin with an internal environment that will support human or animal life during extremely high-altitude flight, space flight, or escape.
(engineering)
A boxlike component or unit, often sealed.
(anatomy)
A membranous structure enclosing a body part or organ.
(botany)
A closed structure bearing seeds or spores; it is dehiscent at maturity.
(microbiology)
A thick, mucous envelope, composed of polypeptide or carbohydrate, surrounding certain microorganisms.
(pharmacology)
A soluble shell in which drugs are enclosed for oral administration.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Simvastatin Reduces Capsular Fibrosis around Silicone Implants.
Adverse prognostic significance of capsular incision with radical retropubic prostatectomy.
Batur M, Gul A, Seven E, Can E, Yasar T Posterior Capsular Opacification in Preschool-and School-Age Patients after Pediatric Cataract Surgery without Posterior Capsulotomy.
We then subjected isolates to PCR analyses for the detection of capsular types D and E, which have previously been detected among C.
In this group of patients, the following treatment was administered to prevent infections: i) broad-spectrum antibiotics intravenously, and 0.5% iodophor injected to the capsular bag every day; ii) after strict disinfection during surgery in phase I, the capsule should be retained and even the broken capsule should be repaired, if possible, and reserved; iii) the artificial capsular bag was wrapped with several layers of wet gauze and normal saline to keep the water and drain the abdominal effusion, then it was wrapped with an aseptic dressing to reduce the contact of effusion and the outside; iv) the dressing was changed when the capsular bag was shrunk every day, and the effusion property change was observed; and v) bacterial culture was done when necessary.
Posterior Capsular Opacification: A Problem Reduced but Not Yet Eradicated.
CT scanning can be useful for the diagnosis of postpartum thrombophlebitis of the renal capsular vein.
Features of PDTC without capsular or vascular invasion are rare although described.
Among 100 patients, 22 had Elschnig's pearls, 68 had moderate posterior capsular opacification and 10 had thick fibrotic posterior capsule.
All patients had surgical synechiolysis to expose the capsulorhexis and then sulcus placement of an Alcon CZ70BD IOL on the oversized residual capsular rim.
Histological Type and Vascular, Capsular and Renal Sinus Invasion
Mild atrophy and capsular changes were observed at 160 g/kg dose as shown in Figure 5.Histopathological changes were observed in thymus in positive control (cyclosporine).Capsular and trabecular changes were observed in positive control as shown in figure 6.