captology


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captology

(Computers As Persuasive TechnOLOGY) Captology refers to using computers to change people's attitudes and behavior. With regard to e-commerce, for instance, customer reviews alongside products encourage people to make purchases, as well as the convenience of "1-Click Ordering," using Amazon as an example. The term was coined by B.J. Fogg in his 2003 book entitled "Persuasive Technology: Using Computers to Change What We Think and Do."

MACrosuasion and MICrosuasion
Fogg defines macrosuasion as being the overall persuasive goal of the product (buy more, return again, share this information, etc.). The small elements within the software that help achieve the macrosuasion goal (default buttons, hints, positive feedback, etc.) are called microsuasion.
References in periodicals archive ?
Everyone staring for hours at a screen has had some exposure to "captology" -- a word coined by behavioral scientist BJ Fogg to describe the invisible and manipulative way in which technology can persuade and influence those using it.
36 ("Persuasive system*" or "behav* change support system*" or captology or "human computer interface" or human-computer interface).mp.
Fogg (2003) coined the term captology as a general concept of the man-computer interaction, defined as the study of computers as persuasive technologies.
Almost 20 years ago, before iPhones and way before Google Glass, Stanford professor BJ Fogg coined a term for the potential of computers to influence human behavior--"captology," from the acronym Computers As Persuasive Technologies.
Fogg of Stanford has written extensively about what he calls "captology"; computers as persuasive technology, and his thinking needs to be integrated into clinical practice.
(The term that Fogg came up with in the mid 1990s to describe this field of study is " captology. ") He also "helps good organizations use tech and new media to influence people" as a consultant working outside the university.
In order to achieve the potential and avoid the pitfalls of persuasive computing, a small but growing group of ACM members has been exploring the theory, design, and analysis of computers as persuasive technologies--an area we call "captology" (based on an acronym derived from Computers As Persuasive Technologies; see www.captology.org).
SEDUCTION IS AN ASPECT OF THE growing field of captology, the study of how technologies persuade.