carabine


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carabine

[kär·ə·bēn or kär·ə·bē·nā]
(meteorology)
In France and Spain, a sudden and violent wind. Also known as brisa carabinera; brise carabinée.
References in periodicals archive ?
(14.) Carabine argues "no one position provides a stable point of reference" (xli).
"'His Helpless Prey': Conrad and the Aggressive Text." Carabine 219-31.
March-Russell's "The Anarchy of Love" builds upon Keith Carabine's fine critique of "The Informer." Relating the amorous/political story to Derrida's ethics of friendship, March-Russell argues that the aesthete narrative voices never fully understand the depth of Sevrin's love for the Lady Amateur.
In the second half Acklam replied when Micheal Benson scored a try and Robert Carabine converted.
As their use became more widespread, they were, depending on the country, referred to as carabine, karabiner, mousqueton, karabijner, moschetto, karabin and, as we English speakers call the breed, the carbine.
(8.) For a discussion of this issue, see Karl, 234-36; Najder, 338-39; Davies (CL 4:26, n2); and Carabine 128M8.
The only bright spot for Acklam was when Michael Benson popped the ball to Robert Carabine to score a consolation try, with a good conversion by Mark Ryan.
Pinker are especially compromised by a need to minimize and justify this latest lapse in completing the novel, Keith Carabine argued persuasively that Conrad began the story either on December 4 or the previous day.
Acklam came back fighting and a good pass by Nathan Thompson to Robert Carabine set them on the attack.
The second half was closely contested, Acklam striking first when good work from Liam Cook enabled Robert Carabine to kick ahead and score his side's third try.
Inter-Relations: Conrad, James, Ford and Others is a collection of thirteen essays, along with a brief foreword by Keith Carabine and two poems ("Pilgrimage I" and "Pilgrimage II") by Paula Burnett.