Carangidae

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Carangidae

[kə′ran·jə‚dē]
(vertebrate zoology)
A family of perciform fishes in the suborder Percoidei, including jacks, scads, and pompanos.
References in periodicals archive ?
Species that frequent the area include surgeonfish, triggerfish (Balistidae), small carangids, porcupinefish, sea chubs, goatfish, parrotfish and puffers.
However, residents tend to target groupers, snappers, and carangids preferentially.
Despite these differences, all estimates are well within the range of M reported in other genera of carangids (Froese & Pauly 2010): Carangoides (0.15-1.40/year), Caranx (0.34-0.58/year), Decapterus (1.40-2.02/year), Megalaspis (0.39-1.36/year), Selarioides (1.46/year), Seriola (0.50-0.94/year), and Trachurus (0.49-1.36/year).
(2012) Fishery and population dynamics of two species of carangids, Decapterus russelli (Ruppell, 1830) and Megalaspis cordyla (Linneaeus, 1758) from Mumbai waters.
A number of authors have investigated the morphometry, length-weight relationship, population dynamics and biology of carangid species (Sivakami, 1995; Kasim, 1996; Zafar et al., 2000; Saker et al., 2004; Panda et al., 2012; Panhwar et al., 2014; Qamar et al., 2015).
The contribution of Megalaspis among carangids was 24.16% while within the finfish resources of 1.63% was recorded in 2009, whereas its highest landing (9722mt) was recorded in 2001 and the lowest (3559mt) in 2008 (MFD, 2012).
During the post monsoon, summer and premonsoon seasons the carangid eggs were more in number and they were collected in all the stations, as already reported during May to June from Coleroon estuary (11).
Distribution of carangid larvae (Teleostei: Carangidae) and concentrations of zooplankton in the northern Gulf of Mexico, with illustrations of early Hernicaranx amblyrhynchus and Caranx spp.
Pelagic clupeoid and carangid resources for fishery development in the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea.
While two carangid species (yellowtail jack [Seriola lalandi] and jack mackerel [Trachurus symmetricus]) are common to the Southern California Bight, Lea and Walker (1995) noted the record of 12 novel carangid species collected within southern California.