carapace

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carapace

(kâr`əpās), shield, or shell covering, found over all or part of the anterior dorsal portion of an animal. In lobsters, shrimps, crayfish, and crabs, the carapace is the part of the exoskeleton that covers the head and thorax and protects the dorsal and lateral surfaces. In many crustaceans, the term carapace is also used to describe the hard, protective covering of the cephalothorax, as that of the horseshoe crab. The carapace of a turtle's shell is composed of expanded ribs and vertebrae overlain by dermal plates and horny scales.

carapace

[′kar·ə‚pās]
(geology)
The upper normal limb of a fold having an almost horizontal axial plane.
(invertebrate zoology)
A dorsolateral, chitinous case covering the cephalothorax of many arthropods.
(vertebrate zoology)
The bony, dorsal part of a turtle shell.

carapace

the thick hard shield, made of chitin or bone, that covers part of the body of crabs, lobsters, tortoises, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Individuals from Bahia and Rio Grande do Norte that occupy forest beyond mangrove areas with organic rich soil formed a sister branch in the cluster analyses of carapaces (Fig.
The rostrum and the back end are the more plastic portions of carapaces, and should be more subject to environmental forcing.
26%) for crab carapaces was due to loss of pigments present on the shell.
Because no lesions developed when bacteria were applied to intact carapace surfaces (n = 2; each challenged and rechallenged 3 times for 3 wk), to facilitate lesion development, a method was developed to erode the epicuticle layer by abrading the lateral carapaces with fine (400-grit) sandpaper prior to filter placement.
Some of the carapaces and plastrons had taken on a rust colored hue, as if beginning to fossilize.
This created a solid three-dimensional reconstruction of the carapaces.
Turtle meat: Softshell turtles with their flat, leathery carapaces have been described as "animated pancakes" for their ability to move or swim with astonishing speed and agility--a good idea since they are a favorite food of alligators.
In both cases, there are some similarities in the external geometry of plastrons and carapaces that tend to be more rounded in hatchlings that hatched within 55 days, and longer in those incubated for over 67 days.