carbocation


Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Wikipedia.

carbocation

[¦kär·bō′kat‚ī·ən]
(organic chemistry)
A positively charged ion whose charge resides, at least in part, on a carbon atom or group of carbon atoms.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Synthetic chemists explain to colleagues how to apply carbocation chemistry in organic synthesis.
Water will suppress methyl radical or carbocation reactions by allowing for the protonation of these materials and preventing them from further reacting with other materials.
Many organic reactions, including industrially significant reactions in biomass processing and petroleum refining, involve chemical intermediates known as carbocations, which feature positively charged carbon atoms.
(22) Note that this account is not fully consistent with the idea of the true structure being a resonance hybrid, although it still is pragmatically useful for understanding the chemical properties of the allylic carbocation.
Styrene oxide gave regioisomer II in agreement with more important electronic effect due to carbocation stabilization.
With this system, complexation of the Lewis acid coinitiator with the acetate group of IBEA dissociates the carbon-oxygen bond to produce a carbocation at the oxygen-stabilized secondary carbon atom of IBEA.
High pHs associated with extended hang time also will suppress the rate of pigment stabilization through aldehyde bridging (mediated by the low pH carbocation form), instead promoting browning.
Its biosynthesis involves the reaction of 3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol pyrophosphate (7) to generate a transient allylic cation intermediate (8), which rapidly reacts with the electron-rich 3-methyl-3-buene-1-ol pyrophosphate (9) to form a carbon-carbon chemical bond and a second carbocation intermediate (10).
* Protonation at the carbonyl oxygen of AA by acid catalyst: carbocation production;