carbon nanotubes


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carbon nanotubes

[‚kär·bən ′nan·ō‚tübz]
(chemistry)
Cylindrical molecules (sealed at both ends with a convex arrangement of atoms) composed of carbon with a diameter of around 1 nanometer and lengths up to a few micrometers. Single-walled nanotubes may be conducting or semiconducting, depending on the diameter and chirality of the tube. Multiwall nanotubes containing coaxial shells of the elemental single-wall nanotubes are also possible.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
White Paper on " Carbon Nanotube Technology Promises a Revolution in Cabling "
While carbon nanotube technology (CNT) has created vast interest for application starting from semiconductors to medical, one stream that is of high focus for research at TE Connectivity is high-performance electrical cables.
Graduate student Mark Haase, spent the past year exploring applications for carbon nanotubes at the Air Force Research Lab of Wright-Patterson.
Medical researchers are investigating how carbon nanotubes can help deliver targeted doses of medicine.
Also, the interaction of organic and inorganic molecules with carbon nanotubes has been extensively studied [27-32].
Looking at Figure 8, we can find out that when the pressure [21] is fixed, a single skin sample filled with 3 x 3 carbon nanotube lines (0.048 g carbon nanotubes) has small variations in resistance as a result of this number of carbon nanotube lines, the spacing between lines is larger, grid density of conductive network is smaller, and the decrease of resistance is limited.
Ebbesen, "Carbon nanotubes," Annual Review of Materials Science, vol.
Munawar, "Synthesis of carbon nanotubes anchored with mesoporous [Co.sub.3][O.sub.4] nanoparticles as anode material for lithium-ion batteries," Electrochimica Acta, vol.
Figure 1: Schematic drawing of carbon nanotubes as heat-dissipation sheets.
There are three different approaches for utilizing carbon nanotubes to enhance the ballistic performance of body armor.
In the lab the filter, technically called a "supported-epoxidized carbon nanotube" filter, was tested using samples with cadmium, cobalt, copper, mercury, nickel and lead, said the release from Rice.