carbon potential

carbon potential

[′kär·bən pə′ten·chəl]
(metallurgy)
Determination of the extent to which an environment containing active carbon can affect the carbon content of a steel.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The carbon potential was varied from (0.9-1.0%) to (0.7-0.8%).
Carbon sequestration rate and aboveground biomass carbon potential of four young species.
The major influencing parameters in carburization are the holding time, carburizing temperature, carbon potential and the quench time in oil as reported by Shewmon [18].
Government policy must focus on creating positive incentives to overcome market failures holding back investment in untapped energy-efficiency and low carbon potential and supporting the most promising RD&D aimed at technological breakthroughs in energy-intensive industries.
The Dubai Carbon Centre of Excellence (DCCE), which aims to leverage the Emirate's carbon potential, has commenced operations and introduced its board members at the first Dubai Global Energy Forum (DGEF).
As Sri Lanka looks to develop into a hub of ethical manufacturing and eco tourism, we need to equip our local businesses to take advantage of our huge carbon potential. Our companies and our products will need to be aware of their carbon impact in order to compete in the new Green Economy", said Subramaniam Eassuwaran- one of the founding Directors of Carbon Consulting Company (CCC).
The Prime Minister said that in order to meet the short term energy requirements of the country, external resources need to be explored on urgent basis while in the long term, hydro carbon potential which is in abundance in the country should be exploited and developed.
Configurable math functions enable the unit to be used for ratio and feedforward control applications and in thermal processing applications to control variables such as carbon potential and oxygen.
In contrast, if the baseline is set at zero, farmers would receive carbon credits equal to the total carbon potential of their land, regardless of whether they had previously adopted or not.
Although increases in either the carbon potential or the carburizing temperature can shorten a carburizing cycle, both methods have drawbacks.
Models for both types of furnaces are based on material balances with the fundamental assumptions that the constituents of the furnace atmosphere are always in thermodynamic equilibrium, and the carbon potential at the surface of the work load is proportional to the difference between the carbon potential of the furnace atmosphere and the instantaneous surface carbon content of the work load.