carbon star


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

carbon star

[′kär·bən ‚stär]
(astronomy)
Any of a class of stars with an apparently high abundance ratio of carbon to hydrogen; a majority of these are low-temperature red giants of the C class.
References in periodicals archive ?
With Peter Sarre he carried out the first complete study of the silicon dicarbide molecule in stellar spectra, following his discovery of a carbon star (IRAS 12311-3509) with [C.
0) Dec RT Capricorni Carbon Star 20h17m2 -21[degrees]20 NGC 6908 Nebulosity 20 25 1 -24 48 NGC 6907 Galaxy 20 25 6 -24 49 Asterism Star Group 20 26 7 -24 57 NGC 7099, M 30 Globular Cluster 21 40 4 -23 11 Palomar 12 Globular Cluster 21 46 6 -21 15 NGC 7158 Unknown 21 57 4 -11 36 Object Type Mag Size RT Capricorni Carbon Star 7-11 * NGC 6908 Nebulosity 14 0.
The primary in this pair is a deep red variable carbon star of 7th magnitude average brightness, with a colour index, B-V, of +3.
Skrutskie of the University of Virginia in Charlottesville and Martin Weinberg of the University of Massachusetts zeroed in on carbon stars, the brilliant, final stage of stars that weigh one to four times as much as the sun.
Dig up these very red carbon stars hiding high in its vicinity these winter nights.
Among the carbon stars, I give my nod to beautiful, deeply reddish orange Y Canum Venaticorum.
Sloan and his colleagues observed dust forming around the carbon star MAG 29, located 280,000 light years away in a smaller nearby galaxy called the Sculptor Dwarf.
The star 19 Piscium is interesting in its own right; it's a carbon star (deep red) and an irregular, low-amplitude variable--hence its alternate name TX Piscium.
the carbon star V Aquilae, one of the reddest stars visible in a
T Lyrae is a type-C5 carbon star, and like many red giants it varies substantially in brightness--in this case between magnitude 7.
A beautiful carbon star with the red-orange hue of a Chinese poppy sits 57' north-northeast of 6th-magnitude 26 Andromedae.
The shedding object is an extreme carbon star, one so rich in carbon that it has veiled itself in soot clouds thick enough to absorb all the star's visible light.