carbon-14 dating


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carbon-14 dating

[¦kär·bən ¦fȯr‚tēn ′dād·iŋ]
(nucleonics)
Determining the approximate age of organic material associated with archeological or fossil artifacts by measuring the rate of radiation of the carbon-14 isotope. Also known as radioactive carbon dating; radiocarbon dating.
References in periodicals archive ?
Carbon-14 dating from remains found at an Arica site, called Acha, estimates that the oldest Chinchorro "natural" mummy is from 7020 B.
In 1988 some of the linen was finally tested by the carbon-14 dating method worked out by Libby (see 1947).
The exhibition will also explore the science of the scrolls, as well as investigating scroll preservation, DNA and chemical analysis, infrared technology, Carbon-14 dating, document reconstitution, and the Dead Sea and San Diego County Mediterranean climates -- without which the scrolls might never have been preserved.
The samples of the shards have been sent to Oxford University for carbon-14 dating, he added.
As recorded by the American Indi- ans (a winter night not long before white men came) and drowned trees (in the winter of 1699-1700, based on carbon-14 dating and tree ring counts), it occurred at about 9 p.
The organic carbon in the soils has been stripped away by wind or water, so scientists can't use carbon-14 dating to estimate when those wet spells might have occurred, says Muhs.
Herodotus, the first philosopher of history, may not have been too sophisticated in the fields of satellite cartography, evolutionary biology, and the physics of carbon-14 dating, but he had something in common with the author of this book.
The carbon-14 dating is "a good piece of work," he says, "but it's not particularly relevant.
Carbon-14 dating has put the age of two of the plants out in the Namib Desert at roughly 1,500 years and counting.
Carbon-14 dating of 100 of the specimens show that the cave has been almost continuously occupied during the past 40,000 years, which indicates ice didn't cover the cave's entrance for any extended period.
Miller's team also used carbon-14 dating and a similar technique that relies on the radioactive decay of uranium atoms.
Oceanographers had previously relied on the carbon-14 dating technique to judge the age of deep-sea sediments, but this method reaches back only 45,000 years.