carbon-arc lamp

carbon-arc lamp

[¦kär·bən ¦ärk ′lamp]
(electricity)
An arc lamp in which an electric current flows between two electrodes of pure carbon, with incandescence at one or both electrodes and some light from the luminescence of the arc.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

carbon-arc lamp

A high-intensity electric-discharge lamp employing an arc discharge between carbon electrodes.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
7 Mike and Doug Starn, "Gravity of Light" (Fargfabriken, Kunsthalle, Stockholm) The Starn brothers place a sun at the center of their own artistic universe: A looming carbon-arc lamp, sizzling and snapping, some relic of Victorian science, searingly illuminates a room ringed with works exploring the meanings of light and darkness.
Options in the past have included ultraviolet-rich mercury lamps, black lights, fluorescent tubes, and open and enclosed carbon-arc lamps. Some of these, such as arc testers, are designed to simulate the complete spectrum of sunlight.