carbonate rock


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carbonate rock

[′kär·bə·nət ′räk]
(petrology)
A rock composed principally of carbonates, especially if at least 50% by weight.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ordovician carbonate rock units found in drill holes on the property are part of a sedimentary rock package that accumulated at the base of an offshore seamount, as at Turquoise Ridge and Twin Creeks.
He added that the Cambrian-age (around 520m years ago) marine carbonate rock samples used in this study were collected by Chinese and Russian scientists during a joint expedition in 2008 to the Lena river region of eastern Siberia.
He added, "Existing simulators lack these capabilities that enable us to predict what would happen during an enhanced recovery process; for example, and how an injected fluid reacts and effects the carbonate rock formations and properties.
Mr O'Sullivan added: "No pups were obvious at the site and it is believed the adult sharks might be utilising degraded coral reef and exposed carbonate rock on which to lay their eggs.
Theoretical laws have been established for each of these petrophysical models in order to relate a small number of measureable rock properties to the recently proposed carbonate rock weathering index (Dubois et al., 2015).
Karst fractures increase the contact area of water and carbonate rock, which is helpful to promote the corrosion of carbonate rock, and have a certain effect on the stability of tunnel bedrock.
The effects of carbonate rock properties, such as uniaxial compressive strength, Schmiazek F-abrasivity factor, Mohs hardness, and Young's modulus on power consumption and production rate have been reported [1, 2].
ROCKS OF SPITSBERGEN Carbonate rock 5 536,36 [km.sup.3] Sandstone & Psammite 4 211,46 [km.sup.3] Mudstone & Shale 1 945,44 [km.sup.3] Siltstone 1 232,27 [km.sup.3] Conglomerate & Breccia 660,73 [km.sup.3] Evaporite 134,45 [km.sup.3] Metaigneous rock 727,31 [km.sup.3] Quartzite 699,39 [km.sup.3] Metasediment 593,22 [km.sup.3] Schist 584,03 [km.sup.3] Marble 413,18 [km.sup.3] Amphibolite 346,41 [km.sup.3] Gneiss 270,03 [km.sup.3] Granite 521,18 [km.sup.3] Plutonite 117,06 [km.sup.3] Vulcanite 25,19 [km.sup.3] Unknown 534,65 [km.sup.3] Total 18 552,36 [km.sup.3]
"Sinkholes are common where the rock below the land surface is limestone, carbonate rock, salt beds or rocks that can naturally be dissolved by groundwater circulating through them.
Researchers at the Digital Core Laboratory use more than 13,000 X-ray images in a computed tomography (CT) scan to make a mathematical reconstruction of carbonate rock samples.
Carbonate rock, typically limestone, is a core component of cement production and is also used in clean coal power generation using Circulating Fluidised Bed (CFB) boiler technology.
Significantly, the oil was trapped in porous carbonate rock between two impermeable salt layers, representing prospective geological stratigraphy in the area that had not previously been recognised for its oil-bearing potential.