carbonation


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carbonation

[‚kär·bə′nā·shən]
(chemistry)
Conversion to a carbonate.
(chemical engineering)
The process by which a fluid, especially a beverage, is impregnated with carbon dioxide.
(geochemistry)
A process of chemical weathering whereby minerals that contain soda, lime, potash, or basic oxides are changed to carbonates by the carbonic acid in air or water.

carbonation

The reaction between carbon dioxide and calcium compounds, esp. in cement paste, mortar, or concrete, to produce calcium carbonate.
References in periodicals archive ?
CONTEX - Hempel's Anti-Carbonation coatings are specially developed to suppress the carbonation rate.
Researchers realized that bubbles could still could be contributing to the sensation of carbonation.
Not only is there the matter of individual health, but the health of the environment also benefits from home carbonation.
This decrease in steel passivation is in fact the worst impact of carbonation in steel reinforced concrete.
Like raisins, small pasta shapes such as macaroni have a density that is just greater than that of water and a rough surface that carbonation bubbles can stick to.
One way of bypassing some draw-backs of accelerated carbonation of primary alkaline earth minerals is using alkaline waste residues from thermal processes or from construction and demolition activities as a feedstock.
Brix (measured using a handheld refractometer), water activity and carbonation were measured at 10 C on freshly opened cans of 14 carbonated beverages.
A home carbonation system, it is not only fun to use but also makes practical sense for someone who consumes as much Pellegrino as I do.
The new process, called residue carbonation, is a high-speed industrial adaptation of a natural chemical process that not only reduces the alkalinity of the waste mud (from a pH of about 13.
The ban would prohibit the sale of anything other than fruit- or vegetable-based drinks made with no less than 50 percent juice and no added sweeteners; electrolyte-replacement drinks with no more than 42 grams of added sweetener per 20 ounces; any milk products with more than a 2 percent fat content; and drinking water with any sweetener or anything with carbonation.
Beverage closures need to withstand extreme climate conditions, long shelf life, and high carbonation levels, while collapsible tubes must resist extreme stress in use.
Carbonation is most problematic and painful for people with chronic heartburn or gastroesophageal reflux disorder (GERD), a condition thought to afflict about 20% of Americans.